(Please visit one of our advertisers)

No donations or subscriptions are required

   OR   
   
Subscription choices:
Board Karma = 40  (3488 positive of 3870 votes is 40 %pts higher than a neutral 50%)
All Things (Safety Oriented) Motorcycle   
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

You can the entire collection of Safety Tip articles in a 33 Megabyte PDF Portfolio

 All Forums
 Motorcycle Safety
 Roadcraft
  MINDSET
 Mindset - The Left Turner
Next Page
Member Previous Topic Discussion Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2
rioguy
Ex-Member

Posted - 06/25/2009 :  8:43 AM                       Like
I chose this situation as it is one that causes a lot of crashes which I feel are planned by the rider who fails to compensate for known common errors of other drivers.

It's a fact that if we put ourselves in a position to be left-turned, our probability of being left turned will be some value for N. Say 1 in 100. (Used for an example, and not intended to be accurate.)

We can reduce our probability of being left turned by 50% just by reducing exposure 50%. I think it's possible to reduce exposure by about 90%.

What can we do to reduce exposure?

The first part of the Roadcraft system is information.

Part of the information phase is giving information. Some things one can do to increase visibility. Wear a white helmet. Wear a brightly colored vest. Use high beams. (Don't flash them as it may be taken as a "go" signal.) Auxiliary lighting. Headlight modulators.
By looking well ahead, one can usually see a vehicle approaching a position to make a left turn.


Let's call this the completion of the information phase. In my opinion, the critical part of the information phase occurs 12 to 17 seconds before the hazard although it doesn't stop there.

Now on to positioning:

Often, speeding up a bit will get us through the intersection before the vehicle gets in position. Or slowing down creates a space big enough for the vehicle to obviously complete the turn before we get to the intersection. If done early enough, the speed change may only be a few mph.

If there is no hazard to the right and it's otherwise appropriate, moving to the right lane could be a choice. If already in the right lane, be aware the other driver's site line may be blocked. I try to avoid having a big space to my left that the left turner might be tempted to use. I'll either creep forward or drop back so I have a blocker in the intersection.

I haven't mentioned everything there is to know about left-turners. In fact, I've completely skipped the end game. Not that it's not important, but I didn't want to write a book.

Roadcraft is big on assignments. Find a corner where you can observe how motorcycles position themselves for left turners. Make notes on what you observe. A voice recorder is good for this. Or set up a video camera. Sometimes one has to give up riding to do these things.




aidanspa
Male Advanced Member
1739 Posts
[Mentor]


Omaha, NE
USA

Harley-Davidson

Road King

Posted - 06/25/2009 :  10:11 PM
I think this is a great post and in my opinion it nails the mindset necessary to be successful using this system.
quote:
Originally posted by rioguy

I chose this situation as it is one that causes a lot of crashes which I feel are planned by the rider who fails to compensate for known common errors of other drivers.

First, accepting that you and you alone are responsible for your safety at intersections (and elsewhere). True, left-turning drivers don't see us. We all know that. It's called "inattentive blindness" and it's a fact. Accept it. Get used to it being a fact of life - start expecting to be hit and plan for it.

quote:
Roadcraft is big on assignments. Find a corner where you can observe how motorcycles position themselves for left turners. Make notes on what you observe. A voice recorder is good for this. Or set up a video camera. Sometimes one has to give up riding to do these things.

Second, I think this is the level of mental effort necessary to make Roadcraft click and allow it to become part of one's subconscious motor cortex level responses. This type of work leads to "the zone" and "the flow".
Go to Top of Page

gymnast
Moderator
4267 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, Idaho
USA

Harley-Davidson

Sportster Sport

Posted - 06/25/2009 :  10:50 PM
An aside. Rioguy your example brings to mind the comment made by many motorcyclists (and other operators) to the effect "but I had the right of way" which is a statement of delusion rather than a fact that is located in a vehicle code. Vehicle codes in the USA's various states specify who must yield right of way, not "who has right of way". Your post is spot on rioguy. If one ignores the need to heed what I term "foreknowledge of situational vulnerability" and compensate accordingly and appropriately prior to conflict, ones assumption of "having right of way" is like playing Russian Roulette. Approaching a "left turner" is a prime example of the need to develop subcortical perceptual and avoidance skills through conscious practice, analysis of options, chalk talks, and study of such things as Roadcraft.
Go to Top of Page

Nigel A
Male Junior Member
68 Posts


TAUNTON, Somerset
United Kingdom

(None)

Formerly BMW 80RT

Posted - 06/25/2009 :  11:24 PM
If I may but-in I feel the point about taking ownership of ones safety regardless of ones rights in law, as it were, is an excellent one to make. There is no use standing on ones rights if one ends up being a splat job.

I was just reviewing the introduction page in the D12 Manual prior to doing a copy for someone, and this piece took my attention in the current conext of this thread,

'Remember, if you will, an excerpt from a book written by the grand father of the present Lord Montagu of Beaulieu in 1906. The book was The Art of Driving a Motor Car and in it he wrote:

ALWAYS ASSUME
1) That that other driver will do the wrong thing and 2) That it is your business, not the other mans, to avoid danger.

For preserving ones safety (and that of ones passengers) on the road such principles are as sound today as they were some 100 years ago. Your safety is truly in your hands and not that of so called safety features which may have been built into your vehicle or even what the local highways department have decided to implement in road engineering.

Your safety is up to you. No body else.'

It really is a question of taking ownership of our own safety. Cynical though that may sound you simply don't trust anyone else on the road until they prove they can be trusted. I mentioned this to a former Royal Navy Commander who commented, 'Just sounds like good ship sense to me'.

Edited by - Nigel A on 06/26/2009 3:13 AM
Go to Top of Page

sibemol
Male Junior Member
50 Posts


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

Shadow 2003 VT600

Posted - 06/26/2009 :  9:48 AM
quote:
Originally posted by rioguy: If there is no hazard to the right and it's otherwise appropriate, moving to the right lane could be a choice. If already in the right lane, be aware the other driver's site line may be blocked. I try to avoid having a big space to my left that the left turner might be tempted to use. I'll either creep forward or drop back so I have a blocker in the intersection.



This is my first post here, and please take this more like a question than a disagreement. Jame's advice on Tip 011 is that one should position oneself as close to the center as possible, and keeping a car on your right side is as safe as it gets (the bigger the better).

What are your thoughts regarding this approach of staying as close to the center as possible?

Generally speaking for intersections, what approach in your opinion is safest? What is the Number ONE danger during an intersection? Left turners or cars running a red light?

Thanks,
Go to Top of Page
rioguy
Ex-Member

Posted - 06/26/2009 :  11:57 AM
quote:

This is my first post here, and please take this more like a question than a disagreement. Jame's advice on Tip 011 is that one should position oneself as close to the center as possible, and keeping a car on your right side is as safe as it gets (the bigger the better).

What are your thoughts regarding this approach of staying as close to the center as possible?

Generally speaking for intersections, what approach in your opinion is safest? What is the Number ONE danger during an intersection? Left turners or cars running a red light?




Sibemo,

Thanks for picking up the thread. The reason I selected the left turn topic is it is an area I feel I might be weak in. The other area is traffic from the right at an intersection. So, take what I say as an opinion.

Personally, I don't care for the idea of ever riding next to another vehicle. I think there was a post from James that clarified that you should be slightly ahead of the vehicle, or at least by their front quarter panel.

It is a technique I use when the opportunity presents itself. However, because of the density of traffic on the roads I frequent, it's seldom an option.

Mostly I ride on roads that are not congested. I feel the safest place for left turners is in the right lane in a position where their view of me won't be blocked by other traffic. I also maintain a speed at or below the speed limit. In this position, I will always have an option to select from. Either slow or accelerate if the person starts to turn. (Note: This may not be true on 2 lane roads where I'll slow more.It's definitely not true if someone is turning from a suicide lane.)

On the Number ONE danger in an intersection, I feel it's the car coming from the right at a stop sign or driveway where there is no merging lane. If one stays in the right lane, there is a period where one has no options. It is the only area in riding that makes me genuinely uncomfortable and I avoid areas where this might be a frequent occurrence.

I actually put most left turn situations pretty low on the concern scale as they are so easily handled as long as one looks for the hazard and keeps their speeds down.

quote:
Generally speaking for intersections, what approach in your opinion is safest?


Here is where we go back to Roadcraft. It will contradict my opinion on the number ONE hazard, but I'm ok with that.

The INFORMATION phase in my opinion is the MOST important phase. A rider can't avoid a hazard they don't see. So the number ONE hazard is a lack of information gathering by the rider. Most situations are quite easily resolved if seen by the rider.

I have a simple front left right back scan:

Front
Is there any reason for the car ahead to slow down?
Do I have enough spacing?
How is my timing for the lights?
Is a car ahead of me threatening to take my lane?

Left
Left turners
Cross traffic
Pedestrians, bicycles, etc.
Driveways before and after the intersection


Right
Traffic entering or turning from the right
Driveways before and after the intersection
Pedestrians, bicycles, etc.

Back
Am I being tailgated?
Is there traffic getting ready to pass me in the other lane?

With the information I gather, I POSITION myself to get a reasonable amount of space from other traffic and also not take away the options of other vehicles. I adjust my SPEED to be with the flow of traffic in a way that seems the safest. If I had gears, I'd SHIFT to be in a gear that allows me to ACCELERATE if needed or DECELERATE a bit just by letting off the throttle. Cover the brakes, especially in touchy situations if you don't always cover. (Capitalized words are from Roadcraft.)

For newer riders, this is probably too much.

Maybe this next part will cause the post to get booted over to my training thread. But I feel it's what separates high levels of Roadcraft from the general riding public. I do tend to be a little obsessive about mental training. Especially training OFF the bike in preparation for riding. When I flew, we spent about 3 hours of study for every hour in the cockpit. I come pretty close to that with riding. Keep in mind, I'm an incredibly slow learner.

It takes about 6,000 repetitions to move a skill to the part of the brain where it occurs unconsciously. Riders WILL get 6,000 repetitions of intersections. Whatever they practice during this time will become a habit. It's my opinion we should consciously put good habits into our subconscious which will take over when something unusual happens and directs our attention to a particular hazard.

This scan takes maybe a half a second. So about 45 minutes of standing a short block away from an intersection and practicing it should suffice. Then 60 miles of driving in a car in a place where blocks are about a tenth of a mile apart. (I know that's only 600 reps, but it should be enough if one does the first part.) At this point, the scan will likely be completely subconscious.

Then you are ready to do it on the bike. If you start to get task saturated, slow down, revert to what you used to do and consider moving to a simpler area to ride in.




Edited by - rioguy on 06/26/2009 2:47 PM
Go to Top of Page
rioguy
Ex-Member

Posted - 06/26/2009 :  11:02 PM
I had an interesting event in my cage today. I was on York in Denver, a one way, 2 lane street with a speed limit of 30 mph. I was doing 30 mph and really practicing my scanning techniques I described in the previous post.

A bicycle was coming down a hill from a cross street to the right and apparently didn't see the stop sign until too late. Fortunately, I saw him at the earliest point I could have and stopped just before the intersection using "yellow light" braking. The rider wasn't able to stop until he was in my lane. My wife said something like she couldn't believe I missed him.

Credit this save to Nigel for introducing Roadcraft and encouraging me to practice.
Go to Top of Page
rioguy
Ex-Member

Posted - 06/26/2009 :  11:39 PM
This post was inspired by an actual crash where the rider was seriously injured. However, I don't have any facts and I'm not even sure this is the right intersection. Let's treat this as a study of a common situation.



Imagine yourself coming from the bottom of the picture about 10 seconds prior entering the picture.

What things would you be looking for? How would you handle the hazards you suspect?

Keep in mind, there is no "right" solution. We may have different ideas that are equally suitable.

Go to Top of Page

sibemol
Male Junior Member
50 Posts


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

Shadow 2003 VT600

Posted - 06/27/2009 :  11:34 AM
Thank you for your detailed description on how to scan hazards during intersections above, all the tips are great and I started practicing them while driving immediately, the tip that I found the most helpful is the one of driving 60 miles on a road Filled with intersections. I'll do that this weekend to gain experience.

Regarding the picture above, if the speed limit is 30MPH, I would first approach the intersection at 20MPH at the most (GRAVEL/SAND on the ground noted), I would be covering my Front brake and the horn, I would shift down to second GEAR. I would keep my bike as straight as possible, I would watch for a possible left turner and be prepared for a panic stop if necessary. Right lane ends. I would possibly say in my mind, "DO NOT SWERVE HERE, BE GENTLE with your BRAKE".

How does that sound?
Go to Top of Page

(Deleted or Lost)

Posted - 06/27/2009 :  1:29 PM
I would add, assuming there are vehicle where they are 'drawn in' on that photo, move to the right hand side of the center (through) lane.
This would be for better visibility to the the incipient left turner in the oncoming left turn lane, and for a safety margin, in case the incipient left turner on my side of the road, changed their mind and decided to go straight on.

I would (on my bike), also flick the headlight onto high (for a modulated high beam), and possibly give a short 'toot' on my horn.
Go to Top of Page

bachman1961
Male Advanced Member
2266 Posts
[Mentor]


colorado springs, co
USA

Honda

CB750 NightHawk

Posted - 06/28/2009 :  12:24 AM

Approaching the cross roads, I'd be scanning for any traffic entering Richview. I do not see STOP signs but they could be driveways.

Other concerns here would be any traffic following me ... Are they local and know of the potentially confusing lane ends for left and right only ?

Are they going to assume either lane to try and overtake me ?

If I were to be turning, I'd be slowing and signaling earlier than my norm and checking the mirrors ... The 'look' of this part of the road appears to beg for traffic to pass on the left or right (if they don't know better or simply don't care) when following slow movers.

This wide area including three lanes looks like it could be a contributing factor to confusion / causation.

~brian
Go to Top of Page
rioguy
Ex-Member

Posted - 06/28/2009 :  5:46 AM
As I have to leave for a ride in a few minutes, I am unable to give my compete answer. Besides, everyone's answer will be different. There is no reason to suspect that mine is any better.

The Roadcraft system uses a specific system for organizing thoughts.

Information
Position
Speed
Gear
Acceleration

A complete answer according to the Roadcraft System would include all these considerations to some extent. For those that are choosing to try this system, I'd suggest at least mentally addressing all these considerations. A post that does it completely would be very long.

Yesterday, I paid special attention to learning about this situation while riding. I found commentary riding helped to expand the scope of things I was looking at. At first it is difficult as there isn't time to say all the words. But with practice I found short phrases that carried a lot of thought. Things like "junction right clear", Sidewalk right open (meaning it came into view and it was time to check it.)

On positioning, there are reasons prior to the intersection to move left or right to improve the vision zone and the ability of drivers to see you. These change based on the traffic ahead.

Speed is a fairly obvious one that I often see violated. Slow down usually a great answer. However, there is a point where speeding up a bit may reduce risk.

Roadcraft is a process. The book gives an overview, but not total answers. That would be impossible. It's up to each rider that wants to practice a scenario to go out and do it and discover a system that works for them. Whether it's Roadcraft or some other organized system doesn't really matter.

Back to commentary. I found that if done verbally often enough, when one gets bored with doing it, the words automatically pop into my mind like a tune that gets stuck in my head. I find myself singing it without realizing it. It's not for everyone. For some, it may be detrimental. But those who find it useful find it very useful.

The ideal response would be from someone who practiced similar situations in their cage or on their bike and posted what they learned. Perhaps even a video with commentary by someone who isn't prone to play up to the camera in a negative way.
Go to Top of Page
redsled
Ex-Member

Posted - 07/23/2009 :  1:44 PM
Hello all. I'm new around here (this is my first post, apart from an intro in New Members), but this topic is one I've spent some time thinking about, having observed a number of near misses due to left turners violating an oncoming motorcycle's right of way. Based on those observations, and throwing in some cognitive theory (my background is behavioral science) here's my $0.02:

1) Driver cognitive failure: "I didn't see him." In my opinion (I have no empirical data on this) the #1 reason bikers get "left turned" is a function of cognitive failure on the part of the offending driver. A motorcycle has only one headlight, or two headlights that are close together (even worse). Car drivers, especially in the US, are not accustomed to scanning for motorcycles - they are scanning for other cars/trucks/buses. As a result, to a car driver a motorcycle's single (or dual) headlight and narrow frontal cross present the image of an oncoming vehicle that is a long way off, especially at night. Combine that with the often faster speed that motorcyclists feel they can safely travel at, and you have a recipe for a major cognitive disconnect, leading a driver to turn left in front of an oncoming motorcyclist.

2) Motorcyclist braking skill failure. In two of the left turn near misses I can recall the motorcyclist contributed to their near-demise by failing to use effective braking technique, resulting in a locked up, skidding rear wheel. How many of us have locked up the rear in an emergency situation, or seen someone else do it? It's pretty common, in my opinion, among newer riders on any type of bike, and in my experience, among cruiser riders regardless of riding experience.

So what can we do to improve our chances of not getting left turned?

I do a couple things when approaching a potential left turn situation. First, if I'm not going that fast, I try to either establish eye contact, or look for other clues that the driver sees me. To improve my visibility I like to move my bike around a bit in the lane I'm in (getting left turned tends to be a solo riding problem, not group rides). This helps the driver's ability to perceive me as a bike, not a car, since cars can't move around within a lane as bikes can, and the driver can then calibrate their sense of timing and distance. I especially favor moving to the right side of my lane, and then taking a diagonal line directly toward the left turner as I approach - again, in an effort to help the driver correctly perceive me as an oncoming motorcycle (this should not be done in an overly aggressive fashion).

The other thing I do to hedge the bet is practice emergency braking and swerving. If you find yourself not using your front brake to its fullest when confronted with the need to stop suddenly, you should take that as a sign to practice more, until it becomes a reflex reaction. Swerving is also an invaluable technique for avoiding colliding with something that is too close for a full braking maneuver. And being able to safely execute both braking and swerving in quick succession is a great skill to practice and have on tap - and hopefully never have to use.

Sorry for the long post - hope it is of some interest, especially to newer riders.

Edited by - redsled on 07/23/2009 1:56 PM
Go to Top of Page

sibemol
Male Junior Member
50 Posts


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

Shadow 2003 VT600

Posted - 07/23/2009 :  3:30 PM
Welcome to the forum. It has been discussed in other forums that making 'eye contact' with a driver pretty much tells you nothing. After researching the issue, I came to the conclusion that I would not waste my precious time staring at a drivers face.
Instead, I prefer to focus in the FRONT WHEELS of the car likely to cut in front of me with a left turn. My reasoning behind this is that the driver could literally be looking right at me at the same time he is pressing the gas because he thinks he will make the turn.
I'd rather watch the wheels, IMO, this tell me more accurately whether the driver is pulling in front of me or not.

As far as swerving, I am starting another topic in the general discussion section of the forum, hopefully we can get some other members to weigh in.
Go to Top of Page

(Deleted or Lost)

Posted - 07/23/2009 :  8:29 PM
quote:
Originally posted by redsled

I especially favor moving to the right side of my lane, and then taking a diagonal line directly toward the left turner as I approach - again, in an effort to help the driver correctly perceive me as an oncoming motorcycle (this should not be done in an overly aggressive fashion).



This is the only bit I would disagree with. Your move within the lane should be in the opposite direction, moving across his field of vision, and ending in the right hand side of your lane, which is where you really want to be in this hazard.
Go to Top of Page
redsled
Ex-Member

Posted - 07/23/2009 :  11:39 PM
quote:
Originally posted by The Meromorph
This is the only bit I would disagree with. Your move within the lane should be in the opposite direction, moving across his field of vision, and ending in the right hand side of your lane, which is where you really want to be in this hazard.



Really? According to whom? I don't know that being on the right side of the lane confers any significant advantage to me if the left turner decides to make his/her move in front of me. In fact, if they commit to making their turn, my chance for escape (assuming I can't stop), may well be to move further left, and attempt to get around the rear of their vehicle. Since I am already vectoring in that direction, if they decide to make their move, I'm already well positioned to take further evasive action if necessary.
Go to Top of Page

rayg50
Male Moderator
2082 Posts
[Mentor]


NYC, NY
USA

Honda

Shadow Spirit 750DC

Posted - 07/24/2009 :  6:17 AM
quote:
Originally posted by redsled

Really? According to whom? ...




In these forums we debate points. Omit lines like those and your contributions will be more readily accepted. The answer to your question above would be someone who is extremely credentialed and extremely knowledgeable. Do you know what that means on this forum? Nothing. A valid point must stand on it's own. We debate the points for the education of everyone. If you disagree with a point by all means please argue against it but please leave out statements like the above.

Although you may feel that being to the left you are in a better position to take evasive action it implies that it would be an attempt to move behind the left turner. On most roads that would mean moving towards oncoming traffic.

There are a number of threads that discuss positioning. The consensus is that the further (right) your position is from a left turner the longer it will take you both to meet . That gives you additional time to be seen, it adds braking time (for both), and it may even move the time of impact sufficiently for you to be able to safely proceed through the intersection without contact.

One of the threads (I believe on this site) attempted to mathematically validate the right hand position as being able to move the time of impact to the point where it could not happen. While I did not fully buy into it because I felt it assumed no action on the part of the car (constant rate of travel, direction etc.), I did find it extremely enlightening. Personally, all things being equal (and they never are ), I will position myself to the right every time.


Go to Top of Page
redsled
Ex-Member

Posted - 07/24/2009 :  10:00 AM
quote:
Originally posted by rayg50

quote:
Originally posted by redsled

Really? According to whom? ...




In these forums we debate points. Omit lines like those and your contributions will be more readily accepted. The answer to your question above would be someone who is extremely credentialed and extremely knowledgeable. Do you know what that means on this forum? Nothing. A valid point must stand on it's own. We debate the points for the education of everyone. If you disagree with a point by all means please argue against it but please leave out statements like the above.

Although you may feel that being to the left you are in a better position to take evasive action it implies that it would be an attempt to move behind the left turner. On most roads that would mean moving towards oncoming traffic.

There are a number of threads that discuss positioning. The consensus is that the further (right) your position is from a left turner the longer it will take you both to meet . That gives you additional time to be seen, it adds braking time (for both), and it may even move the time of impact sufficiently for you to be able to safely proceed through the intersection without contact.

One of the threads (I believe on this site) attempted to mathematically validate the right hand position as being able to move the time of impact to the point where it could not happen. While I did not fully buy into it because I felt it assumed no action on the part of the car (constant rate of travel, direction etc.), I did find it extremely enlightening. Personally, all things being equal (and they never are ), I will position myself to the right every time.




Thanks for your feedback, RayG - I take your point. Although I certainly could have done without the "really?" part of that post, I was truly interested in finding out what the basis for Meromorph's strong assertion was. It sounded to me like he was referring to actual research into this matter.

As far as mathematical models and arguments that hold together logically, I would submit that those are worth exactly and precisely not very much. The actual experience of those who have been involved in an incident or observed first hand an incident is far more relevant and useful. All the rest is opinion and speculation. That's not my opinion, either - it's a fact. (Ask someone who has been in the military about an AAR).

Again, I do take your first point about not being inflammatory with the posts, and I thank you for taking the trouble to point that out.
Go to Top of Page

(Deleted or Lost)

Posted - 07/24/2009 :  3:32 PM
Yes, I was referring to actual research by James Ouellet.
I have emailed redsled an offer to email him a PDF of Ouellet's paper presented at the 1990 International Motorcycle Safety Conference.
Anyone else wants a copy, there is a standing offer, email me your email address and I will reply with a copy.
Go to Top of Page

proney2009
Junior Member
31 Posts


Bluffton, SC
USA

Suzuki

Hayabusa

Posted - 10/02/2009 :  2:54 AM
Hi Rioguy,

I'd like to take a stab at the situation you posted in the picture. What would I do as I approached this unmarked intersection?

LOOK/READ. What lies ahead presents several situations that could be dangerous. An unmarked crossroad, a car on my left probably making a left turn, and a car ahead coming the opposite way looking like it's going to make a left turn. There are a lot of possibilities here for something to happen that are not under my control, so....

SLOW DOWN, immediately. If something happens, I need time to react, period. If I don't have that, nothing else matters. So I'm throttling down immediately and long before reaching that crossroads.

ANTICIPATE/DECIDE. What dangerous situation is most likely to happen? It's that car ahead turning left in front of me, or a car from that I didn't see entering the road. So what am I going to do if that happens? I'm going to swerve right and make sure I'm going slow enough to do that. OK so I've decided, but that could land me in another bad situation if there happens to be a car tailgating me or which is coming up in the right hand lane to make a turn, so...

LOOK RIGHT. Are there any cars in the right lane coming up? Are there any cars right behind me? If no, I stick with my anticipated decision. If yes, I have to change it.

MOVE TO WHAT I THINK IS THE SAFEST POSITION TO BE IN. The lane I'm in, right hand side.

IF there are no cars on my right or behind me, I'll stay there and be ready to make a quick swerve right if something happens.

If there are cars, then I'm gonna have to settle for second best. I'll tap my front brake very lightly once or twice to try and alert the driver behind me. If the car left turns in front of me or another car enters the intersection, I'm ready for an emergency stop.

I guess that's how I'd approach this situation. Tell me what I did right or wrong.

Go to Top of Page

Axiom2000
Male Moderator
1761 Posts
[Mentor]


Georgetown, Delaware
USA

BMW

F 800 GT

Posted - 10/02/2009 :  5:14 AM
Proney,
Welcome to the site. If you would like go to the New Member area and post some information about your self and your ride. Just an FYI, Rioguy is no longer a member here, note the Ex-member notification next to his posts.

As stated in the original post there may not be a single correct answer to how to handle this situation. You seem to have given it a lot of thought and I tend to believe your instincts are good about it, especially your first move in recognizing a potentially dangerous situation and slowing down. Always a good move.
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Discussion Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
Jump To:
All Things (Safety Oriented) Motorcycle © Master Strategy Group Go To Top Of Page
  This page was generated in 0.47 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05