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 Motorcycle Safety
 Aging and Disabilities
 Travelling with medications
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Leaky
Male Junior Member
91 Posts
[Mentor]


San Diego, Ca
USA

Harley-Davidson

XL1200C, FLHTCUI

Posted - 01/28/2011 :  5:28 PM                       Like
As I read this category, I have noticed that many riders are diabetic, and require insulin (which requires refrigeration). I am also one of these riders.

I discussed my riding conditions/needs with my doctor, and he prescribed Levemir and Novalog insulin Flexpens. Levemir is long acting (24hrs) and the other short acting. I use the Levemir twice a day, cutting the dosage in half to prevent sugar "swings", and the Novalog for short term compensation. I also carry stashes of hard candy everywhere to prevent my blood glucose from dropping to dangerous levels.

The benefit to these meds is that they are designed to fit into a shirt pocket and don't require refrigeration for well over a month.

My wife puts my daily use pills into those weekly containers with the days marked on them so it's easy to tell if I've missed a dose.

I carry any "controlled substance" meds in their original packaging, along with the documentation required to allow me to possess them.

I hope this post will be a good start on the subject.

Warmest Regards, Bruce


"8 hours bottle to throttle" - an old pilot's rule

Edited by - Leaky on 01/28/2011 8:17 PM

Night Train
Male Advanced Member
1667 Posts
[Mentor]


Sydney, Nova Scotia
Canada

Harley-Davidson

99 Sportster XL 1200

Posted - 01/29/2011 :  10:25 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Bruce,

I wasn't aware that the insulin didn't require refrigeration. Whenever I pick up my wife's insulin from the pharmacy, they take it out of the refrigerator therefore I make it my last stop for errands so I can take it straight home and put it in the fridge. When traveling by bike or by car, we keep her insulin in a plastic baggie with a freezer pack. Most motels have a fridge or freezer and don't mind refreezing the freezer pack at no charge. Like you, we keep the insulin in it's original box with the pharmacy label attached. We keep her medications and insulin together in a container with her blood/sugar meter where it can be accessed easily. She is good at keeping track of her sugar levels but if she were to ever fall into unconsciousness, I want the meter close so I can immediately check her sugar levels to determine the course of action and report them to 911 when I call.

Thanks for bringing this subject forward.
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Leaky
Male Junior Member
91 Posts
[Mentor]


San Diego, Ca
USA

Harley-Davidson

XL1200C, FLHTCUI

Posted - 01/30/2011 :  10:05 PM
EXTREMELY IMPORTANT CORRECTION!

Night Train, after reading your post, I got the impression that other readers might get the idea that my insulin flexpens, and insulin in general, doesn't require refrigeration at all.

In fact, to my knowledge ALL insulin does. My flexpens are kept in the fridge until I use them for the first time.

So before we set a potentially life threatening situation in motion, I am posting what I believe is the CORRECT information.

Warmest Regards, Bruce
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Cash Anthony
Female Administrator
1466 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, Texas
USA

Honda

Magna 750

Posted - 02/01/2011 :  8:46 AM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Thanks for the correction, as I too thought it was important to keep insulin in the fridge.

One of the problems with traveling now is that, while it's convenient to use those day-marked containers, if there's a question about what's in them while you're on the road, you have no information except what you remember.

For the patient, it's usually clear what each pill is, but for others who might have to deal with a situation, they would have little knowledge from what's marked on the pills themselves.

I know, 'cause I have to count out about 18 for each day. I'm about to travel on a plane to the west coast, and I have to figure out which ones would likely to be questioned and which ones I have to take in the Rx bottle. (None are controlled substances - well, actually one may be.) And of course, anything liquid is a bigger issue, as I don't want to have to check a bag.

The TSA folks are getting better (at least in some airports) about asking you in advance if you have anything in that's liquid but is in a small container in your carry-on luggage. Some of them will allow you to take liquids on if you disclose them voluntarily (that is, they don't have to find them and ask about them).

This happened when I was traveling with my elderly mom a couple of years ago. I thought we'd gone over the rules in great detail, but we got to the airport and I saw that she'd packed something forbidden (hand cream, arthritis medicine, toothpaste, or something like that). The TSA woman who checked her through was very kind and let her keep it, because I saw it in time as we stood in line and showed it to her.

You never know...


Cash
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aidanspa
Male Advanced Member
1739 Posts
[Mentor]


Omaha, NE
USA

Harley-Davidson

Road King

Peer Review: 1

Posted - 02/01/2011 :  10:52 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Cash Anthony

For the patient, it's usually clear what each pill is, but for others who might have to deal with a situation, they would have little knowledge from what's marked on the pills themselves.
If I needed to travel or take a bike road trip with medications I'd consider getting a USB medical data card, dog tag or bracelet.

Some of these, like this one, allow you to download digital images (X-Rays, EKGs, MRIs). I'd consider taking a close-up picture of each pill I take along with a description and dosage info and storing it in the "Medications" folder.

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Cash Anthony
Female Administrator
1466 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, Texas
USA

Honda

Magna 750

Posted - 02/01/2011 :  11:08 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
That's an interesting gadget.

Something else you said will solve the problem for the short-term, though: taking a picture of each Rx pill along with a close-up of the bottle's label with all the information on it. At least it would be on my cell phone if I needed it.

Excellent! Thanks a lot.


Cash
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tusome
Male Junior Member
97 Posts


St. Louis, MO
USA

Harley-Davidson

Rd King

Posted - 01/01/2015 :  7:38 PM
I know it has been years since this topic has been touched, but better late than never. Just wanted to add some personal experience on this topic. I have been a diabetic for 45years or more. I have had diabetes through the teenage years, the twenties, marriage, boy scouts, camping, youth camps, heart surgery, over the road motorcycle trips, out of town training, etc. etc.. I have had to take my insulin from the inside of a Johnnie on the spot at boy camp to dropping my vile of insulin into the toilet at a McDonalds at the beginning of a two week youth trip to a South Dakota Indian reservation(what would you do?). I take Lantus and Regular insulin daily. I go through a vile of Reg. Insulin every month and it never hits the refrigerator from the moment I pick it up from the drug store to moment I empty it. I carry it with me every day where ever I go. I have talked to my doctor about this many times. They are happy that my A1C numbers have been between 6.0-7.4 over the last 5-10 years and have not expressed any concern over whether or not my insulin is refrigerated or not. The expiration dates of the insulin is usually about two years out. The refrigeration process guarantees the strength of the medication for that period of time. Yes, if you leave the insulin out in the heat of the day it will degrade over time, but not fast enough to worry about. At least that has been my experience. I cannot use the pen injectors as they leave too much of a bruise.
I carry candy with me at all times. I carry granola bars in my jackets and in several places on the bike at all times. I mainly use the pecan granola bars as there is no yogurt to melt on those hot days. And they stay good enough to eat in an emergency for years. Yes, for years. When we were at Yellow Stone I left the granola bars in the bike instead of in the tent with me. The bike was within several feet of the tent if I needed any food over night without attracting any bears to the tent.
If you are a diabetic you need to know the details of how your prescribed insulin works. For instance, the regular insulin I?m on starts to lower my sugar around the two hour mark and hits its peak strength at about the 4 hour mark. So, after every time I take my dose of insulin I test my sugar at two and four hours after the injection. That way I know how it is working and if I need to adjust by eating something to compensate for the amount of injected insulin. Also if I need to take a little more insulin to compensate for too much breakfast, etc.
I take all my pill medications in the original prescription bottles with me in case I need to prove the authenticity of the medication I am on.
I had triple bypass 20 years ago, and all three bypasses were clogged 100% 10 years ago. I have lived on collateral circulation for the last 9 years and with 5 implanted stents for the last year. I take all kinds of heart medication every day. Never give up, enjoy whatever you ride. I enjoy riding my big old hog, because it makes me feel alive.
As always check with your physician before making any modifications to your drug regimen. This is my personal regiment and by no means a recommendation for anyone. Just thought it might help someone.
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