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 All Forums
 Motorcycle Safety
 Motorcycle Accident Reports - WITH COMMENTS
 Ego exceeds ability
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Young Dai
Male Junior Member
67 Posts


Southend, Essex
United Kingdom

Honda

ST1100a

Posted - 04/02/2014 :  10:40 AM                       Like
No squids were harmed in the making of this film

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...us-road.html

The Cat and Fiddle is a relatively short road run across the Pennines, a bit like the tail of the dragon with sheep and snow. The name refers the moorland pub more or less in the middle of the routre

I would suggest the lucky rider need not buy a lottery ticket for the remainder of this year as he has just used up all of his luck

scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6886 Posts
[Mentor]


Pleasanton, CA
USA

KTM

990 Adv, XR650L

Posted - 04/02/2014 :  11:47 AM
What are we supposed to learn from that?

The guy wasn't riding in a responsible manner. The article implies that he went off of a 40-foot cliff, but he just went down an embankment. The car was the big danger to him, the embankment not so much.
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onthebeach
Male Standard Member
109 Posts


Arch Cape, Oregon
USA

Suzuki

V-Strom 650 ADV

Posted - 04/02/2014 :  12:07 PM
I was unable to view the video on the website as scripts that they used did not make Firefox on Linux at all happy. However I did find the youtube video here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYkuYg5qvPI

Comment 1:
I find it very difficult to judge speed from many of the small cameras such as Go-Pro. I think due mostly to the wide field of view.

Comment 2:
When I am riding I am enjoying the sights and smells of nature in addition to the fun of leaning a motorcycle around corners. This fellow seems to have his priority focused more on speed. That's fine, but he should have been exploring his cornering ability on a track. Seems to me he nearly met the oncoming car on that corner. Would have been bad for the rider and completely unfair to the occupants of the car.

Comment 3:
He was wearing good gear and I am glad he survived. I'm pretty certain I would not have been as quick to spring to my feet after such a tumble. I hope this fellow is as grateful that he did not bring harm to innocent car occupants as he is to have survived and modifies his riding style when sharing a public road.
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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6886 Posts
[Mentor]


Pleasanton, CA
USA

KTM

990 Adv, XR650L

Posted - 04/02/2014 :  3:43 PM
quote:
Originally posted by onthebeach

I was unable to view the video on the website as scripts that they used did not make Firefox on Linux at all happy. However I did find the youtube video here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYkuYg5qvPI
The one at the first link just showed the very end, when nobody was in front of the rider. Now I understand more what the issue was, and I think we can learn something useful from that.

In this second video, he is behind other riders for quite a bit. He finally decides to pass them, and it's right after passing the second rider that he suddenly finds himself going too fast for the curve, goes over the line, almost becomes a hood ornament on the oncoming car - missing it by inches - then rolls off down the embankment.

If you're riding on a twisty road at an interesting speed, you set up for each corner by judging the safe speed through it, braking to that speed, then taking the corner. If you pass somebody on a short straight, you tend to want to get around them as quickly as possible, which involves accelerating to a faster speed than you might otherwise go on that road. If you don't get back down to your desired speed before the next turn, you'll have the same issue that guy had, going too fast into the corner.

When I decide to go around some slow guy on a twisty road, I have to consciously get back down to my desired speed after I get around them and before the next turn. This often involves braking harder than I like to before a corner. Most of the time I like to leave the bike in one gear and not accelerate out of each turn like that rider, so that I don't have to do much hard braking before the next corner. But I have bikes that have a lot of torque, so I have a wider available powerband available to keep the ride interesting.

The thing we can learn from this video is that when you accelerate to pass somebody, make sure you slow back down way before the next corner.


Waiting for the comments about just going slow everywhere and being patient with slow traffic...
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rayg50
Male Moderator
2082 Posts
[Mentor]


NYC, NY
USA

Honda

Shadow Spirit 750DC

Posted - 04/02/2014 :  7:14 PM
Here is my observation.

After overtaking (passing) he seemed to continue to accelerate well past the point where he needed to. He went into the corner a bit hotter than I would have expected but did slow a bit before entering the turn and it appeared to me as if he could have negotiated the turn.

For no apparent reason he stopped turning, went straight, barely missed the oncoming car, and went off the road. At first I thought he low sided but after looking at that part a few times it looks as if he remained upright.

To me he either misjudged the turn (he thought it was straightening out) or he saw the car and got caught by target fixation.
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twowheelsbg
Male Junior Member
50 Posts


Burgas, Burgas
Bulgaria

Suzuki

Posted - 04/03/2014 :  4:42 AM
quote:
Originally posted by scottrnelson
The thing we can learn from this video is that when you accelerate to pass somebody, make sure you slow back down way before the next corner.



Sure, this is the proper way to act. But mistakes happen and there are reasons for them. I would speculate that this particular rider aside from lacking skills and judgement, had been riding long enough behind his colleague. He had comfortably following and got used to ride relatively fast behind without the need to choose proper entry speed. He was just following trustfully, speed control was just in terms of preserving proper distance to the leading bike. But, as we saw, he got bored to follow when they caught up another bike and the leader decided to drop the tempo and follow him. This speed reduction seemed to be way below the desired for our guy, so he decided to take the lead preserving tempo and ride pleasure. Taking the lead of course required other entry speed judgement style, other from what he had used to do so far, mentally he seems to me unprepared for such change. The mistake followed in first corner requiring the different approach. Leading conservatively and following trustfully are different tactics, usually our brains need some time to switch over attitude.
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Beary
Male Standard Member
181 Posts


Edmond, Oklahoma
USA

Harley-Davidson

Road King Classic

Posted - 04/03/2014 :  2:21 PM
I agree with RayG50 that the rider paniced and lost control of the situation. In fact, I think this is a perfect example of why over 50% of motorcycle accidents are single vehicle.

This rider may have very well been going too fast, but we won't know because the car interupted his turn. But assuming for a moment he wasn't going too fast to make the turn, he paniced and reacted incorrectly. This is what most of the riders in single vehicle accidents did as well.

Lots to learn here as far as the proper approach speed into turns, but it is also important to expect the unexpected. Which in of itself may be a reason to consider how to approach a curve.

Beary

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SkootchNC
Male Advanced Member
1063 Posts
[Mentor]


raleigh, north carolina
USA

Harley-Davidson

road glide

Posted - 04/04/2014 :  4:50 AM
I couldn't help but notice the camera rider "climbed up the back" of the bike he was following, once the third bike came into the picture.
I notice the lead bike maintained his distance behind the third bike, which leads me to think, the camera bike rider was less experienced, or very impatient.

Camera bike rolled past the lead bike, and climbed up the back of the third bike, and then passed crossing a double solid line (same as our double center line "Do Not Pass").

Target fixation on the Camera Bike Rider's part played a part, I'm sure, but "operator error" played a larger part
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Safe N Smiling
Male Junior Member
33 Posts


On a Bike Somewhere, Here and There
USA

(Unknown - Other)

Several Bikes

Posted - 10/08/2015 :  9:05 PM
He goes into the curve way to far on the left side of his lane and is not leaning off his bike enough. I'm guessing he is not leaning enough because the wall he is next to is intimidation him.
Right when he passes a change in the shape of the wall he straightens up a bit and goes a bit wider... again I'm guessing the wall intimidated him more. The right angle wall startled him.
Just as he straightened up a bit he saw the bike and hit the brakes straightening the bike up completely and he goes straight.

I doubt it is target fixation.... just the braking that straightened up the bike making him go straight.

He was literally inched from killing the driver of that car.

Terrible rider. Both overtakes were over double lines and the second after big warning signs on both sides of the road.

I bet he was bitching about the slower 3rd rider the other two had slowed down behind, but then proved to be more lame himself.

Really race type behavior on a two way public road is just wrong.
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bachman1961
Male Advanced Member
2263 Posts
[Mentor]


colorado springs, co
USA

Honda

CB750 NightHawk

Posted - 10/10/2015 :  5:14 AM
In the longer vid, it appears to me the rider used extra speed and acceleration unnecessarily after getting around that last bike he passed. He was safely passed it when the soundtrack and apparent speed of the bike revs even more. It seems that either set him up for not making that curve or he over drove the bike without having the cornering skills proportional to the speed.
I agree that he panicked. His bike/body position seems all wrong for cornering or even a feeble attempt at recovery. I can picture good or experienced riders suspecting the near edge of the margin and knowing how and when to perform a favorable cornering technique.

He was in trouble before he knew it so maybe it goes without saying he didn't anticipate it and that may speak to lack of experience or just not knowing the road well. Glad it ended without much harm.
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