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 Motorcycle Safety
 Contrary Opinions
 Laying Her Down
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commonground
Male Standard Member
155 Posts


Windsor, PA
USA

Yamaha

V Star 1300

Posted - 09/18/2016 :  4:32 AM                       Like
Hi Guys, I have seen this in a couple different places on the internet. I am having a tough time wrapping my head around the logic here.

Here are some thoughts that jumped into my head.

Was the concept of controlling your speed to enable you to stop within your sight distance totally ignored?

If he skidded 100 feet before laying it down, speed was likely a big factor.

Once you go down, is it prudent to hang on to the bike or let it go to do it's own thing without you?

Your comments

https://www.facebook.com/scottjacob...44123060872/

Edited by - commonground on 09/18/2016 5:15 AM

greywolf
Male Moderator
1495 Posts
[Mentor]


Evanston, IL
USA

Suzuki

DL650AL2

Posted - 09/18/2016 :  7:37 AM
I don't use Facebook so can't comment on what sounds like a lot of ignorance being spouted. I can say it's important to let go of the bike as you're going down. You need to avoid the scenario where the sliding bike has the tires contact the ground, flipping you over the top in a high side crash. You want the bike sliding ahead of you as its mass being higher and non rubber coefficient of friction being lower will move it away from you in a low side crash. A high side crash adds the extra excitement of the bike running into you after you both are down.
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commonground
Male Standard Member
155 Posts


Windsor, PA
USA

Yamaha

V Star 1300

Posted - 09/18/2016 :  9:01 AM
I tried to find the video without going through Face Book but, could not. The guy narrating this from his hospital bed, said he crested a hill to find gravel on the road. At the bottom of the hill was an intersection with traffic. He braked and skidded 100 feet while staying vertical and then laid it down. As he was sliding along the bike tires caught, bike righted itself and threw him over the top. Then the bike somersaulted and landed on his head and shoulder. He was wearing a helmet that saved his head but, will have to have a new shoulder installed. He is describing how his lay down was the best thing to do.

Edited by - commonground on 09/18/2016 10:48 AM
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1695 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Posted - 09/18/2016 :  11:27 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Another one in which he came to a stop, bike and him sliding, before the intersection. Which just makes me say, stay on the tires and brakes with even shorter stopping distance, BUT,

The oddity here is that he was in the cannonball contest, which is OLD bikes. 100 year old, or older. He may very well have had a rear brake only, and some skinny tires. Plus, how effective is a 100 year old braking system anyway.
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greywolf
Male Moderator
1495 Posts
[Mentor]


Evanston, IL
USA

Suzuki

DL650AL2

Posted - 09/18/2016 :  3:42 PM
A 100 year old braking system is more effective than a slide. Using the brakes may have put him down in gravel. If braking put him down, holding on to the sliding bike was a mistake as the danger I described earlier happened to him.
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1695 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Posted - 09/19/2016 :  10:06 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
I found the motorcycle that he rode a 1915 Harley V-twin F11. This bike did not come with a front brake, but the rules allow and encourage certain things like fitting a front brake, which they did.

These bikes might have a top speed of about 60 mph. When manufactured, the roads were dirt, and rutted, and braking distance deemed appropriate for the roads they travelled and the average speed you might ride on them.

My hunch would be, he crested that hill, saw gravel on the road, and may not have even touched the front brake under that circumstance. He described the gravel as spread across the entire road after the crest of the hill, and he said he skidded down the hill for 100 ft., without slowing and felt like on ice. At the bottom of the hill was a stop sign for him, and active traffic passing through the cross street.

I'd have to reserve judgement on braking ability, down hill, covered in gravel, with a stop sign at the bottom of the hill, taking his statement as accurate.
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