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 Motorcycle Safety
 Safety Gear
 Wrist Protection- what works for you?
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WJobson
Male Starting Member
4 Posts


Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey
USA

Triumph

Bonneville T100

Posted - 11/29/2012 :  1:11 PM                       Like
What kinds of wrist protection do your gloves offer? Does anyone use separate wrist guards or supports? I have somewhat thin wrists and want to protect them best I can. Thanks.

scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6890 Posts
[Mentor]


Pleasanton, CA
USA

KTM

990 Adv, XR650L

Posted - 11/29/2012 :  3:30 PM
I don't think I've ever heard of anything special for wrist protection other than making sure that they're 100% covered in leather - which is what I do.
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D R
Advanced Member
1053 Posts
[Mentor]


Northern, Virginia
USA

BMW

R1200RT

Posted - 11/29/2012 :  4:24 PM
Like Scott, my glove protection is primarily for coverage (and warmth in colder temps). I do however prefer gloves with hard knuckle protection to guard against road debris thrown out by nearby traffic. If your motorcycle has hand guards, the knuckle protection isn't necessarily needed. I also prefer gauntlet style gloves. If you're looking for something beyond what I've said, you could start here:

http://www.bikebandit.com/motorcycl...pports/n1285

I've not used anything like what is shown there so I can't speak to the pluses or minuses.
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greywolf
Male Moderator
1495 Posts
[Mentor]


Evanston, IL
USA

Suzuki

DL650AL2

Posted - 11/29/2012 :  4:37 PM
I broke a hand and wrist plus separated a shoulder on the only crash I've had involving injury. I had been away from riding for 16 years and forgot my dirt bike training. If you see an unavoidable impact coming, grab the opposite upper jacket sleeve with each hand and pull your knees up as high as you can and do your best to stay balled up before hitting the ground. If I had done that, I would only have has bruises. Instead, I did a runner's reaction and put an arm out as the pavement approached.

Edit. Once on the ground, sliding will be better than rolling if you can make the transition.

Edited by - greywolf on 12/01/2012 3:42 PM
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jilp
Male Junior Member
84 Posts


Mexico, Mexico
Mexico

BMW

R1200GS

Posted - 12/01/2012 :  1:20 PM
Greywolf, would you please elaborare more on that fall impact technique? If you have diagrams or some graphic aid. I have never heard of that. Thank you
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greywolf
Male Moderator
1495 Posts
[Mentor]


Evanston, IL
USA

Suzuki

DL650AL2

Posted - 12/01/2012 :  3:40 PM
You want to to keep from extending and breaking arms. Grab your body with your hands, opposite side upper jacket sleeves pulls your elbows in tightest.

If you can control a slide once you hit and can manage to go feet first and be sure not to catch a foot that will bend your leg back, that's probably best but it's hard to be sure. Digging a foot in will probably break a leg and start the spin anyway.

A controlled slide will be best but make sure you can control it. Drawing up into a ball will make you go father as you roll but good protective gear will take a lot of that punishment. You'll be out of control though and rolling into something solid will hurt.

The best thing is to practice safe riding to keep from going down. If you do go down, slower is way better than faster. Get your speed down as much as possible first.
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Night Train
Male Advanced Member
1667 Posts
[Mentor]


Sydney, Nova Scotia
Canada

Harley-Davidson

99 Sportster XL 1200

Posted - 12/03/2012 :  1:58 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
quote:
Originally posted by WJobson

What kinds of wrist protection do your gloves offer? Does anyone use separate wrist guards or supports? I have somewhat thin wrists and want to protect them best I can. Thanks.

Gauntlet style gloves will over some protection for your wrists or alternately you can pick up leather wrist gauntlets like the cowboy wranglers used to wear. These gauntlets can no doubt be made at a local leather or shoe repair shop. To see some pics of them, just google "wrist gauntlets".
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greywolf
Male Moderator
1495 Posts
[Mentor]


Evanston, IL
USA

Suzuki

DL650AL2

Posted - 12/03/2012 :  9:45 AM
Gauntlets will protect from road rash. They won't protect bones. I had excellent gloves with armored inserts and still broke my hand and wrist. The only way to keep from doing that is not to stick your arm out when falling.
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Axiom2000
Male Moderator
1761 Posts
[Mentor]


Georgetown, Delaware
USA

BMW

F 800 GT

Posted - 12/03/2012 :  12:48 PM
quote:
The only way to keep from doing that is not to stick your arm out when falling.


I got a funny feeling this would be a lot easier said then done. I think it's just a natural reaction to extend you arms to break a fall. It maybe the correct thing to do but I bet it would take a tremendous about of will to accomplish it.
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D R
Advanced Member
1053 Posts
[Mentor]


Northern, Virginia
USA

BMW

R1200RT

Posted - 12/03/2012 :  2:18 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Axiom2000

quote:
The only way to keep from doing that is not to stick your arm out when falling.


I got a funny feeling this would be a lot easier said then done. I think it's just a natural reaction to extend you arms to break a fall. It maybe the correct thing to do but I bet it would take a tremendous about of will to accomplish it.



If you've received any type of training in any form of martial arts, one thing taught is how to fall so as to minimize injury. Learning to not necessarily extend your arm to break a fall does take practice. I can assure you that of all the training I've received, none of it addressed falling from a moving motorcycle. In theory, it should work when coming off a motorcycle, but I'm not going to go out and test it.
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Magnawing
Male Senior Member
281 Posts


The Woodlands, TX
USA

Honda

VF750C

Posted - 02/28/2013 :  9:31 AM Follow poster on Twitter
Sorry to revive an old topic but, here goes...

I have put this into practice and it does work well. I had an unintentional get-off in 1987 just outside of Reno, NV.

I was 19 and still invincible when I decided that I would show that danged Harley rider that he couldn't pass my new Ninja 1000 without an answer. I dropped 2 gears and pulled up the front wheel. My buddies say I was going about 70 mph and looking at the sky when a gust of desert wind hit me from the side and pushed me off the highway. I tried to bring the front wheel down but lost control when I hit the "sand". I felt the bike going down and my martial arts training kicked in. I jumped clear of the bike and curled into a ball (think fetal position). I landed on the back of my right shoulder and proceeded to slide and spin for about 30 yards on my right side. Luckily, I was wearing full leathers, steel toed boots and a high quality Bell helmet. My right glove was missing, the entire right side of my leathers was worn away from the right side seam to about the middle of the back and the helmet had a flat spot about 4" in diameter with a hole the size of a quarter in the middle. I got out of that one with a broken collarbone, mild concussion and road rash from my right shoulder all the way to my right ankle. 10 days and about 30 debridings (sand & gravel removal from my body) later, I rode back to San Diego (I know, not the wisest choice) and have not intentionally lifted my front tire since.

But back to the original intent...learning to pull in your limbs during a fall will definitely help to prevent broken bones.

Sorry for the long post.
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randysway223
Male New Member
12 Posts


POMONNA, CA
USA

Kawasaki

250r

Posted - 06/07/2013 :  12:39 PM
I never actually heard of usin a wrist guard. Is that actually a thing?Doesn't it get uncomfortable at times?
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randysway223
Male New Member
12 Posts


POMONNA, CA
USA

Kawasaki

250r

Posted - 06/20/2013 :  11:04 AM
Honestly, I just stick with some decent enough icon gloves. They're pretty good. They have metal knuckles so If I do go down and need to clench my fists, I'm assuming it'll hold up very nicely :)
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Indiana Randy
Moderator
2118 Posts
[Mentor]


Fort Wayne, Indiana
USA

Honda

2000 Magna V4 750

Posted - 06/21/2013 :  12:14 PM
I always wore wrist guards when snowboarding. They protected my wrists multiple times. Never considered them on a motorcycle.

http://www.rei.com/product/842043/d...-guards-pair
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randysway223
Male New Member
12 Posts


POMONNA, CA
USA

Kawasaki

250r

Posted - 07/03/2013 :  2:29 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Indiana Randy

I always wore wrist guards when snowboarding. They protected my wrists multiple times. Never considered them on a motorcycle.

http://www.rei.com/product/842043/d...-guards-pair

I'd imagine you've had some difficulty riding though. It might get a little bit uncomfortable right?
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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6890 Posts
[Mentor]


Pleasanton, CA
USA

KTM

990 Adv, XR650L

Posted - 07/03/2013 :  3:56 PM
quote:
Originally posted by randysway223

quote:
Originally posted by Indiana Randy

I always wore wrist guards when snowboarding. They protected my wrists multiple times. Never considered them on a motorcycle.

http://www.rei.com/product/842043/d...-guards-pair

I'd imagine you've had some difficulty riding though. It might get a little bit uncomfortable right?

Blake Baggett won a recent 250cc outdoor motocross race at Budds Creek while wearing a similar wrist guard. It might have been uncomfortable, but I don't think he had any difficulty riding. Outdoor motocross is some of the most difficult riding there is, and they go all out for more than half an hour.

He's the green Kawasaki with #1 on it in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=66MAHi612R4

Edited by - scottrnelson on 07/03/2013 4:02 PM
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randysway223
Male New Member
12 Posts


POMONNA, CA
USA

Kawasaki

250r

Posted - 07/08/2013 :  2:00 PM
Touche very good point.

Yeah motocross is a pretty intense sport. Wrist guards are a bit more important in that, because they're doing crazy stufff LOL .
I think for normal on the road riding, it's better to remember to not throw your wrist out and catch yourself. Normal gloves are okay.
I just have a pair of http://www.motorcyclehouse.com/men-...934-prd1.htm and I have no doubt in how they'll protect me.
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Magnawing
Male Senior Member
281 Posts


The Woodlands, TX
USA

Honda

VF750C

Posted - 07/09/2013 :  8:01 AM Follow poster on Twitter
Those gloves will protect your hands from abrasions in the event of a spill. They won't, however, do anything for your wrists. The only way to really have a chance of not sustaining a wrist injury is to practice not putting your hands out when falling. In Martial Arts we practice break-falls...falling in such a way as to minimize the chance of injury. The key is not allowing "hard parts" (elbows, hands, head, knees, etc.) from hitting the ground. They teach us to use our arms and legs to absorb the impact.
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