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 All Forums
 Motorcycle Safety
 Sharing of Lessons Learned
 Watch out for Painted Road Markers
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RiderJohn
Male Starting Member
6 Posts


Centerton, AR
USA

Kawasaki

Vulcan 900

Posted - 04/04/2012 :  7:54 PM                       Like
I try to avoid paint by sometimes it's just not possible.

As I was coming up to an intersection and braking moderately I rolled across 'left turn' arrow and my front brake locked up a second before my rear brake locked up. I kept the bike upright and resumed my route safely.

That afternoon I looked at my skid marks and I have to give myself high marks for brake control and sheer luck. I must have adjusted my breaking several times on both wheels through the unfortunate skid based on the length and width of the skid lines. To some one watching it must have looked like the bike was dancing. I dislike road paint...

radan2
Male Advanced Member
1117 Posts
[Mentor]


Jacksonville, NC
USA

Moto Guzzi

2007 Breva V750 ie

Posted - 04/04/2012 :  11:54 PM
This is a pet peeve of mine. There is no reason that those very slick markings need be used as often as they are.

Motorcycle groups need to make our concerns known. ABATE, I believe, has worked to get rid of the slick paint. So has AAA.

The worst are those that are actually made of molded plastic that is bonded to the highway. They remain slick for years. I see no reason that grit could not be bonded in the resin so they would not be so slick.
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1680 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 04/05/2012 :  9:14 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
I try to avoid painted lines, and even aim for the spaces between those blocks of paint on crosswalks. I'm noticing newly painted markers now have a mix of reflective material mixed in. I'm suspecting some sort of plastic. As they dry, I see shiny residue overspray around them.
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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6875 Posts
[Mentor]


Pleasanton, CA
USA

KTM

990 Adv, XR650L

Posted - 04/05/2012 :  9:38 AM
It is not that hard to steer around painted road markings. I'm sure we have as much paint area on the roads around here as anywhere. Minimizing the amount of time spent riding on paint is part of my line selection whenever I'm riding in populated areas.

I know that paint is slick when wet, but I don't trust it when dry either. When I do have to cross a bit of paint I make sure that I'm not hard on the brakes or generating much cornering force.

But I will admit that about a month ago I had my rear tire slip a little while accelerating over paint, since for some reason I was thinking that maybe I was being a bit to cautious when riding over paint. It was a good reminder that you can never be too cautious when riding over paint.
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Peter Darby
Male Standard Member
110 Posts


Manassas, va
USA

Kawasaki

Nomad

Posted - 04/05/2012 :  11:41 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
If I am going to roll over large painted areas. I tend to treat them like something in the road I can't avoid. I go over them upright. with no braking or accelerating. That goes double if the road is wet. My other rule is never stop with the rear tire sitting on paint.
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kacinpa
Male Advanced Member
802 Posts
[Mentor]


Lansdale, PA
USA

Triumph

Sprint GT

Posted - 04/05/2012 :  12:14 PM
quote:
Originally posted by rkfire

I try to avoid painted lines, and even aim for the spaces between those blocks of paint on crosswalks. I'm noticing newly painted markers now have a mix of reflective material mixed in. I'm suspecting some sort of plastic. As they dry, I see shiny residue overspray around them.



The reflective material is glass beads and they are applied on top of the wet paint, as they don't work if mixed in.

My son recently completed an Eagle Scout project entailing reflective paint on the curbing of our church. One of the Church Elders is a paint chemist and provided the paint and the glass beads to be applied to the wet paint. The beads are crazy slippery loose by themselves but actually make the dried paint less slippery once the loose stuff blows away.
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Halap
Male Junior Member
60 Posts


Brooklyn, NY
USA

Suzuki

M50

Posted - 04/05/2012 :  5:45 PM
Paint markings are a bane of NY streets, and there are places you cant avoid rolling over them (not to mention some places where they present the best surface ). First choice is avoidance, but if not, you can still get plenty of friction from them in the dry, just gotta be careful not to lock up the front brake. The problem for me comes in the wet/moist or under hard braking. Then I will ease up brake pressure over the painted parts and try to get all the deceleration I can when the front wheel is rolling over gaps in the paint.
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1680 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 04/06/2012 :  8:53 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
quote:
Originally posted by kacinpa

The beads are crazy slippery loose by themselves but actually make the dried paint less slippery once the loose stuff blows away.



Do you have a source for that claim? I'm just curious because it's just not consistant with my experience. The only online remark I found was from the Ottawa Safety Council, stating the reflective paint is slippery when wet due to the reflective material.
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kacinpa
Male Advanced Member
802 Posts
[Mentor]


Lansdale, PA
USA

Triumph

Sprint GT

Posted - 04/06/2012 :  7:04 PM
quote:
Originally posted by rkfire

quote:
Originally posted by kacinpa

The beads are crazy slippery loose by themselves but actually make the dried paint less slippery once the loose stuff blows away.



Do you have a source for that claim? I'm just curious because it's just not consistant with my experience. The only online remark I found was from the Ottawa Safety Council, stating the reflective paint is slippery when wet due to the reflective material.



The only source I have is from almost falling on my butt in a spot where some of the kids spilled some of the glass beads on the pavement. Walking on the dried painted curb was not slippery at all the next day after sweeping off the excess that did not adhere. Granted this was a concrete curb painted with concrete paint. The paint used on asphalt or concrete may be different but I can't see how the addition of the beads, if they are well embedded in the paint, could lower the CoF of the paint to tire compound. The rougher surface vs the smooth paint should provided a higher CoF.
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1680 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 04/06/2012 :  7:38 PM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
I don't KNOW either. Although, I can imagine the beads getting round and polished over some length of time, by traffic.
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gymnast
Moderator
4248 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, Idaho
USA

Harley-Davidson

Sportster Sport

Posted - 04/06/2012 :  7:55 PM
Here you go, "Guide for Pavement Friction". More than just about anyone ever wanted to know about the the subject, however an excellent source of information "for the beginner".
http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepub...hrp_w108.pdf
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