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 Motorcycle Safety
 Safety Gear
 Safest gear you can wear?
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JMalmsteen
Female New Member
13 Posts


Long Island/Lancaster, NY/PA
USA

Harley-Davidson

XL1200

Posted - 03/09/2014 :  4:05 PM                       Like
I have Bohn armor that has lower body protection. I have worn these under a pair of Kevlar reinforced jeans. The chaps will not fit over this combination because of the added bulk from the armor.

Do you guys think it would be safer to wear the Kevlar jeans with the Bohn armor or the jeans with the chaps? I don't have tons of faith with the Bilt Ironworker Kevlar jeans since the Kevlar is only located in the knee and backside area. I think I would have some pretty good road rash if I were to crash in them.

Has anyone had any experience with these Kevlar type reinforced jeans?

The Motorport stuff is probably the best out there but it's over 1k and with the armor is probably closer to $1500.

I did get race boots made by TCX. They are TCX-RS2 boots and were the best that I could find at Revzilla. You can't feel the shifter, which is another safety issue altogether, but I'm hoping that I will get used to them.

Upper body I have a Leatt airfit 3df compression body armor shirt that I wear when I wear my Schott motorcycle jacket, or I will wear a Tourmaster Transition 2 jacket in the winter which has built in armor.

What do you use for crash protection?

onthebeach
Male Standard Member
109 Posts


Arch Cape, Oregon
USA

Suzuki

V-Strom 650 ADV

Posted - 03/09/2014 :  5:58 PM
You chose the word "safest" in the title of your post, and said nothing about cost until the body of your posting. For most people, certainly including myself, cost is something considered for any non-trivial purchase.

To answer your question about what people wear: I ride with Motoport stretch Kevlar pants and jacket, with their highest level of armor. Before purchasing I had them send me a sample of the stretch Kevlar and the mesh Kevlar. If budget was unlimited I would also get a set using the mesh for summer riding. But I'm in Oregon and ride mostly the western part of the state so the days when it is uncomfortably hot are relatively few. I also have a name brand full face helmet, Motoport Kevlar gloves (both summer and winter gloves) and good quality riding boots. Yep, a large amount of money invested in all that gear.

And just ordered last week is a Hit-Air vest to go over this gear. That is one of the CO2 inflated vests tethered to the motorcycle and inflating (in 250 milliseconds they say) if you separate from the bike. With a couple spare CO2 cartridges and shipping that was just few dollars above $500. Ouch - the expense hurts, but perhaps that will cut down on the pain of an unintentional "get off".

I have fair confidence in the Motoport Kevlar gear with armor to save my skin in a slide. I went for the vest figuring that this would add some neck protection. This hope for neck protection was really the factor. I'm not so worried about the deadly accident (of course I want to avoid that) but I sure don't want to be paralyzed due to a neck injury thinking that I would have liked to have had that added protection.

I am like a fair number of riders - rode when young, sold the bike when I got married. I have now just hit 60 and while still married don't have the same responsibility of young kids and needing to build retirement funds that I had when younger. So I can financially afford to ride, both from the aspect of risk and buying a bike and gear.

Note: The longer I ride the less this gear cost on a yearly basis. If properly amortized you can justify almost any purchase.

So there is the answer to the "what do you use for crash protection" part of your question.

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Magnawing
Male Senior Member
281 Posts


The Woodlands, TX
USA

Honda

VF750C

Posted - 03/10/2014 :  1:22 PM Follow poster on Twitter
The most important piece of safety gear a rider has is inside of their helmet.

Being aware of what's going on around you at all times, not getting distracted, not riding when you're overtired or angry and knowing & riding within your limitations are key factors to riding safely.

That being said...buy the best gear you can afford. Layers work wonders...layers of high quality leather work even better (usually).

And, never ride without a helmet because of the opening statement.
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Safe N Smiling
Male Junior Member
33 Posts


On a Bike Somewhere, Here and There
USA

(Unknown - Other)

Several Bikes

Posted - 10/24/2015 :  2:10 PM
Motoport. Their gear is pretty much unbeatable.
So much goes into the material and nothing is wasted on style or "batman" looks.

They are really the leaders in street road safety gear. They are also race certified.

While Diagnose and Alpinestars make great gear (well their top of the line stuff is) they are really only the best for track racing. They are designed around race track use where racer performance is still the priority with safety being a close second.

They are designed for short slides..... pro racers don't come off on the straight sections. They come off on turns and slide very quickly into grass and special light gravel. The racers nearly all the time do not go high in the air.

The way I look at it motoport gear is a fantastic deal. It is expensive, but the motorcycle market has an abundant supply of fabulous used motorcycles that will save you a heap of money off retail. I always buy used motorcycles, even ones that might need some work. This leaves a nice budget for the very best tires that I also retire young and plenty of money for the very best riding gear.

I was even lucky to get my current Motoport gear used.

There have been times when I have been riding a motorcycle that cost less than my gear.

What is rather absurd is that I often see bikers with really expensive BMW and Ducati motorcycles that are priced far higher than the rest of the market due to brand prestige and greedy dealerships.... but the riders are using cheap or so so gear. What I really don't like seeing is bikers with some of that expensive gear that is not good gear at all. I won't name them, but they are mostly the over rated "Adventure Gear" brands.
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Safe N Smiling
Male Junior Member
33 Posts


On a Bike Somewhere, Here and There
USA

(Unknown - Other)

Several Bikes

Posted - 10/24/2015 :  2:27 PM
quote:
Originally posted by JMalmsteen

I have Bohn armor that has lower body protection. I have worn these under a pair of Kevlar reinforced jeans. The chaps will not fit over this combination because of the added bulk from the armor.

Do you guys think it would be safer to wear the Kevlar jeans with the Bohn armor or the jeans with the chaps? I don't have tons of faith with the Bilt Ironworker Kevlar jeans since the Kevlar is only located in the knee and backside area. I think I would have some pretty good road rash if I were to crash in them.

Has anyone had any experience with these Kevlar type reinforced jeans?



I bought Bohn Armor. IMO it's pretty much useless in a crash. The mesh is lighter than some dance pants I've seen. It is absolutely pointless to have armor that is kept inlace by something weaker than a grandmother corset.

In a crash and slide the forces are such that poor gear like Bohn Armor just won't be where is is when you need it.

To give you a better idea of what I'm getting at just take a look at Alpine Stars Bionic shorts.
It has several types of material and very strong mess. Once on it stays inlace because it is tight and has both hard and soft padding. They have silicone grip strips that keep the shorts from creeping out of place while riding.

That said I am all for wearing armor that is not integrated in your top layer.

As for Kevlar reinforced jeans .... they are better than straight jeans, but to get Kevlar jeans that have sufficient kevlar you will need to spend quite a bit of money.

My advice to you is look for used motoport gear. But most of all I hope you never have to thank me for the advice..... buy that I mean I hope you will never crash.
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bachman1961
Male Advanced Member
2263 Posts
[Mentor]


colorado springs, co
USA

Honda

CB750 NightHawk

Posted - 10/27/2015 :  12:14 AM
Re; ^ ^

At least the Grandmother Corset doesn't come out on top as the leading safety gear to wear. For a second there, I was rethinking how much I like to ride and how safe I want to be.
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bachman1961
Male Advanced Member
2263 Posts
[Mentor]


colorado springs, co
USA

Honda

CB750 NightHawk

Posted - 10/27/2015 :  1:06 AM
I can't say I did it right or did it best but I am happy with my choices on the gear.
Beyond what seemed the normal standards of design and features for safety, padding, CE armor and such, I looked to fit, colors or contrast and some trusted name brands. I do a lot of reading on things so I find user reviews and look for strengths or weak links then consider prices and sales to see how it all shakes out. I didn't spend $500 on a helmet or $1000 on the apparel but I was happy to find some good rated gear and score some sale prices. The jacket was a last years item but the TourMaster Trans II has been around a long time and seems to get some little feature or improvement every year or 2 so I was happy to save approx $75 off the list. It has bold contrast colors and vis was a consideration. The overpants are almost a twin to the jacket but by Fieldsheer (I think) and were $80 off the list price.
The key to my thinking here was versatile 3-season stuff that will work almost all year so I don't have to double my investment on two of everything. The gear works as I hoped for fit and comfort that can range from low 90's in summer to teens and low 20's when roads can still be clear or dry enough to ride. I can qualify this by my shorter mile commutes or rides around town so you know I'm not talking about lots of long rides at hwy speeds when we have temps below 25 or 30.

I don't count boots or gloves in the cost here as I had them already so I'm going to say I was done at about $400 ; add gloves/boots cost.
I consider my visibility on the bike as an important part of the gear and helmet choice. Front to rear vis is very different from the profile view of a bike with bright colors (if you have bright bike) so make every choice count in the best possibly ways !

Admittedly, I didn't strive for top tier stuff but I find a wealth of good trustworthy info in moto mag write up's and tests by those in the biz so I don't always just leave it to 'mom and pop' reviews. It's good to verify and question the stuff you read too. Sometimes they just write what you want to hear!
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Baggsy
Male Advanced Member
720 Posts
[Mentor]


Ottawa, Ontario
Canada

Suzuki

09 Wee

Posted - 10/27/2015 :  8:31 AM
I wear things that I'll take the time to put on, can afford, and offer some bang for the buck, as well as, convenience for the type of riding that I'll be doing.

I have a custom two piece leather suit, racing boots, heated vest, etc, but I also have some mesh and cloth gear that are sometimes better suited for the conditions.

I've found that the suit and boots are impractical if I'm teaching, as I'll spend more time walking and picking up cones, then actual riding, but I need to be able to don gear quickly when doing demos. I wore them once and it was like a sauna, combined with a shin torture device.

I will also be getting a new jacket an helmet next year for the course.

So far I've been using motorcycle specific gear that keeps me cool in the heat, and should be fine at low speeds. The route to the course has one straight stretch at 50 mph, and the rest is slower. The problem is that I'm not sure how it would do in a fall.
Mesh or perforated jacket, with a pair of cordura pants, full leather gloves, leather boots that cover the ankle, and a flip up helmet.

For running the twisties, I use the suit, racing boots & gloves, and a full face helmet.

At some point I hope to pick up a Motoport jacket and pants, but the 5 jackets and 4 pairs of pants in the closet, make that an awkward discussion with my wife.



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Safe N Smiling
Male Junior Member
33 Posts


On a Bike Somewhere, Here and There
USA

(Unknown - Other)

Several Bikes

Posted - 12/22/2015 :  6:47 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Baggsy

At some point I hope to pick up a Motoport jacket and pants, but the 5 jackets and 4 pairs of pants in the closet, make that an awkward discussion with my wife.




Just show your wife this posting and sell off the other stuff:
http://advrider.com/index.php?threa...-mph.507934/

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TooManyHobbies
Junior Member
45 Posts


Patchogue, NY
USA

BMW

Posted - 07/15/2016 :  9:05 AM
I don't want to be a "victim of marketing," but over the years I've heard people say very good things about Motoport. This morning I spent an hour or so reading through their articles and I'm wondering why I'd buy anything else? Well, the cost, but I picked out some gear from Rev'it and while it will be fine for PLP, I don't think I'd feel comfortable at speed, meaning it would go in the closet and I'd buy the Motoport anyway.

With Rev'it I was planning on spending about $550 for a mesh jacket and pants... mesh because it's hot and PLP isn't going to generate much wind. Motoport has mesh that they claim is as tear resistant as leather! I also like that their light weight armor not only protects better than what's in the more inexpensive gear, but stays in place and covers more of your body.

I know the idea is to not crash, or depend on gear, but I wear a seat belt when I drive... Im buying a cheap bike, so I can justify the expense if it's not all smoke and mirrors. Am I a victim of marketing, or is the stuff as good as they claim?
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onthebeach
Male Standard Member
109 Posts


Arch Cape, Oregon
USA

Suzuki

V-Strom 650 ADV

Posted - 07/15/2016 :  10:38 AM
When I bought my first small bike in a return to motorcycling after a many year absence I researched gear and went with Motorport jacket and pants. I went with the "stretch Kevlar" instead of the mesh because I am in western Oregon and most of the time it is reasonably cool and high temperature is not a problem.

I cannot give you a report as to how well the gear protects you in a crash because I have not tested that feature. I hope I do not. I will tell you what I can about the gear.

I did go with the quad armor hoping that would add some extra protection from broken bones in the event of a crash. The pants and jacket seem to be of good quality and excellent workmanship. A nice feature is being able to customize quite a bit. I got a small zippered pocket on the left sleeve which is where I stuff my earplugs and I find very handy. If I had it to do over again I would add one on the right sleeve as a place to tuck a credit card for gas stops.

The gear is quite heavy when you pick it up however I don't notice the weight at all once I am on the bike. They tailor the pants such that the armor is in the correct position when you are on the bike. They will ask you about seating position - sport bike or more upright riding. I was pretty shocked when the stuff arrived and I saw how much it weighed but fortunately that is not a problem at all when on the bike.

I did ride to Nevada a couple years back and was out on some 100+ days. I'm sure the mesh gear would have been better but with the vents in this open as long as I was moving it was not all that uncomfortable.

I was pretty nervous about how the gear would fit and quite relieved to find that it fit perfectly when it arrived. They give you detailed measuring instructions. Buy a cloth tape measure at a fabric store if you don't already have one and get a helper to assist with measuring.

What with my helmet, boots, gloves, and Motoport jacket and pants I spent more on gear than a used Rebel 250. But I figured that one slide and trip to emergency room could easily cost way more than the gear so seemed like a reasonable expense. After about 1000 miles of riding I bought a new Suzuki V-Strom 650 (much nicer to ride than the Rebel, but also much more expensive). I eventually sold the Rebel for about what I paid for it.

So far the gear has held up well and I find it very comfortable when riding. Something more lightweight without the thick armor would probably be more comfortable for walking around off the bike. I am happy with the Motoport gear and would not hesitate to recommend it.
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