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 Motorcycle Safety
 Rider Training Courses
 Taught my "first" class :)
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Baggsy
Male Advanced Member
720 Posts
[Mentor]


Ottawa, Ontario
Canada

Suzuki

09 Wee

Posted - 08/24/2015 :  10:48 AM                       Like
Well, I went and did it.

When I started the process, I didn't know how much work, stress,
and especially enjoyment it would be.

It's exhilarating and terrifying at the same time.

There are so many little things that you need to convey to people to try and keep them safe, while at the same time get them riding as much as possible over the two days.

This was my first solo, being teamed with another instructor. All of the students rode within their abilities, but we did have two drops on the first day.

If anyone has tips, I would be most appreciative to hear them.

I'm hoping to be able to sleep more on the weekend nights, during the next course.

greywolf
Male Moderator
1492 Posts
[Mentor]


Evanston, IL
USA

Suzuki

DL650AL2

Posted - 08/24/2015 :  11:50 AM
That's great. You will learn so much yourself and really make a difference to those learning to ride. Drops happen.

Everyone learns at different rates and has a preferred learning method. I found it important to make sure a student masters a concept before going to the next concept. For those having trouble, see if you can figure out how a student likes to learn. A usual stumbling block is clutch friction point. Some like to hear an explanation. Some like to see detail close up. Some need to feel the action.

For example, I like to virtually describe a clutch as two plates that will rub together to create movement. Moving the clutch lever moves the plates until they touch. Then the plates don't really move any more but only press each other more firmly. That's why proper clutch action to start the bike is to move the clutch lever until the friction point is felt then nearly stop for the pressure transfer, then move again once the bike starts to move.

Explain that. Give the visual students a close look at your hand. Even let a kinesthetic learner put a hand on top of yours as you find and release the friction point.
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