(Please visit one of our advertisers)

No donations or subscriptions are required

   OR   
   
Subscription choices:
Board Karma = 40  (3488 positive of 3870 votes is 40 %pts higher than a neutral 50%)
All Things (Safety Oriented) Motorcycle   
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

You can the entire collection of Safety Tip articles in a 33 Megabyte PDF Portfolio

 All Forums
 Motorcycle Safety
 Rider Training Courses
 Study: effectiveness of training
Member Previous Topic Discussion Topic Next Topic  

Horse
Senior Member
263 Posts


Newbury, Berkshire
United Kingdom

BMW

R850RT

Posted - 02/14/2016 :  12:25 PM                       Like
Does an on-road motorcycle coaching program reduce crashes in novice riders? A randomised control trial

Rebecca Q. Ivers
Chika Sakas
Teresa Senserrick
Jane Elkington
Serigne LoSoufiane Boufous
Liz de Rome

Highlights
On-road motorcycle coaching was not associated with reduced risk of crash.
Coaching was associated with reduced near misses after 3 but not 12 months.
Riders in the coaching group reported more confidence, speeding behaviours and riding time.

Abstract Objectives

Motorcycle riding is increasing globally and confers a high risk of crash-related injury and death. There is community demand for investment in rider training programs but no high-quality evidence about its effectiveness in preventing crashes. This randomised trial of an on-road rider coaching program aimed to determine its effectiveness in reducing crashes in novice motorcycle riders.

http://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...45751530097X

Edited by - Horse on 02/14/2016 1:01 PM

DataDan
Advanced Member
540 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 02/14/2016 :  3:05 PM
Thanks very much for the link, Horse. Excellent find.

For info, this is a new paper from Australia published in October. Full text is available as a PDF. No paywall!
Go to Top of Page

Doc
Male New Member
13 Posts


LAS VEGAS, NV
USA

Suzuki

GSX650F among others

Posted - 02/14/2016 :  4:45 PM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Very interesting study. If I read it correctly, the findings that on-road training does not reduce the chance of a crash, it does lead to more confident riders who will then tend to ride more. What's more interesting is that the same was true for driver training programs.

Several years ago, I looked into doing an on-road course as a follow-up to beginner rider training, but could not justify the expense from a business perspective. Marketing the class was another consideration, as there are so few people willing to take follow-up training, let alone road courses. Yet, when I ride with newer riders, and give them some friendly tips, I've had some tell me that they learned a lot. Why people don't understand that better riders are happier riders is beyond me.
Go to Top of Page

DataDan
Advanced Member
540 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Peer Review: 1

Posted - 02/14/2016 :  6:29 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Doc

Very interesting study. If I read it correctly, the findings that on-road training does not reduce the chance of a crash, it does lead to more confident riders who will then tend to ride more.

The Billheimer matched-pairs study of training effectiveness in California came to a similar conclusion--though that part wasn't publicized. Both beginners who took the basic MSF course and experienced riders who took the ERC rode nearly 50% more miles in the year following training than their untrained counterparts. I posted some ideas about this in the thread Can the Effectiveness of Training Be Measured?
Go to Top of Page

Doc
Male New Member
13 Posts


LAS VEGAS, NV
USA

Suzuki

GSX650F among others

Posted - 02/14/2016 :  9:12 PM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
quote:
Originally posted by DataDan

quote:
Originally posted by Doc

Very interesting study. If I read it correctly, the findings that on-road training does not reduce the chance of a crash, it does lead to more confident riders who will then tend to ride more.

The Billheimer matched-pairs study of training effectiveness in California came to a similar conclusion--though that part wasn't publicized. Both beginners who took the basic MSF course and experienced riders who took the ERC rode nearly 50% more miles in the year following training than their untrained counterparts. I posted some ideas about this in the thread Can the Effectiveness of Training Be Measured?



Thanks for the link. I understand that UC Berkeley is supposed to do a study in the next few years to look at training effectiveness, but am not sure what measure of success they are looking at. My guess is that if they are looking at crash reduction, the result will be similar. I remember the first ERC that I took in 1994, after riding for 20 years, and wondered how I lived so long on a motorcycle. I either had become terrible complacent or never knew some things. The class opened up my mind to things that many riders simply don't know. That's what convinced me to become an instructor.

The new BRC/ERC (now called BRC2) goes much further into rider judgement, perception and behavior than the old classes ever did. That's one of the reasons that I was so disappointed in what Total Controls did in CA. They stepped far backwards, but are selling it as revolutionary. Bunk. However, the new skills test in the BRC matches what the DMVs demanded, something that most of us instructors are dumbfounded about. The test doesn't test technique at all, somehting that doesn't make sense to me. If a person has horrible technique, but can manage to get the machine through corner, they can get a license. Dumb. If a person has horrible technique, it's going to get them in trouble.
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Discussion Topic Next Topic  
Jump To:
All Things (Safety Oriented) Motorcycle © Master Strategy Group Go To Top Of Page
  This page was generated in 0.36 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05