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 MSF BRC vs. Rider's Edge
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Slammed Low
Female Starting Member
5 Posts


Appleton, WI
USA

Harley-Davidson

883L

Posted - 08/06/2009 :  6:44 AM                       Like
Hi everyone,

I just completed an MSF class a couple of weeks ago- it was 16 hours long. I had also been looking at the Rider's Edge class. The RE is 25 hours long, and about $130 more. The guy at the Harley shop told me that the only differences are 1) they are taught on Buells 2) everyone in the class either owns or wants a Harley. So are the 9 extra hours devoted to exclusively Harley stuff like motorclothes and customization? Sort of like a Womens Garage Party and MSF combined? Just curious.

dhalen32
Male Moderator
844 Posts
[Mentor]


Omaha, NE
USA

BMW

R1200RT

Peer Review: 1

Posted - 08/06/2009 :  5:18 PM
Slammed:
Another good question. My only comment about the response from the dealer you consulted is that he is either ill-informed or they run their Rider's Edge program differently than the model says they should.

Here are some facts and features of a properly conducted Rider's Edge class. These are mandatory and by the book. I am listing them from memory as to how they happen in my program here in Omaha:

The range (riding) portion of the class is essentially identical to the MSF BRC. Dealer owned Buell Blasts are the only training bikes available. While the exercises are identical, the Rider's Edge program encourages giving the students extra time to ride and thus perfect the techniques/objectives of each exercise. We run nearly every exercise 30 minutes instead of 15, 20, 25 or 30 as per the MSF range cards.

Breaks are mandatory every two exercises (approximately once an hour). During the hourly break students are asked to answer a few learner centered questions by writing their answers in a journal we provide to each student. This journal (called a Road Book), is used periodically during both classroom and range activities to document milestones, set goals, reflect personal feelings and be a resource reference in the future for every student. Most of our students embrace journaling while others consider it nonsense.

With the extra riding time and mandatory breaks, our range time ends up working out to be closer to 12 hours rather than 10 in a standard BRC.

Think of the classroom as the standard BRC plus quite a few additional activities, to the tune of 10 hours versus 5 hours in a standard BRC class. Listed below are some of the additional activities:

I mail the students their text book after signing them up and have them read and answer the study questions in the appendix prior to their arrival the first night of class.

In our dealership we start the class with a dealership tour lasting about 30 minutes. In my opinion, this activity is the closest thing embedded into the curriculum that could be called marketing/selling on the part of H-D/Buell. However, during this tour our motorclothes staff does a terrific job of showing students how to choose and fit a helmet properly along with the virtues of choosing and wearing other protective gear such as glasses, goggles, gloves, jackets, pants and boots. The Instructors do not participate actively in the tour but I usually tag along to make sure the gear presentation is thorough enough to prepare them for a later activity I like to use for them to teach each other about protective gear.

We use a set of H-D flash cards and a history timeline poster in a team building activity to have the students get acquainted with one another. We give them each a few cards and then their team of four works together to place them in chronological order. The exercise runs about 15 minutes.

We run a 10 minute activity on bike types in a student-led discussion on what they are looking for in a motorcycle. They discuss seat height, weight, engine size, power, style, features required for intended use, etc in order to make them think before buying any motorcycle. We have both a Blast and a Ulysses in our classroom if they need to point something out, ask a question or try out a riding position.

At the end of the risk awareness/acceptance discussion we use the crash scenarios in the appendix of the BRC RiderCoach guide and each team is asked to analyze, dissect and discuss one of those scenarios. Then they report their conclusions from their discussion on crash cause and preventive measures to the other teams. These are optional activities in a BRC; mandatory in the Rider's Edge version of the class.

On the second classroom night the students are asked to conduct a presentation on protective gear for their peers (remember the tour?). I pair the students up and then randomly assign them to certain items of protective gear such as helmets, gloves, boots, jackets, etc. We send them down to the showroom floor for 5 minutes on a scavenger hunt to find their assigned gear and bring it back to the classroom where we then get 5 or 6 presentations of what to look for when choosing and fitting the gear.

Following the gear presentations we give them an extended break (30 minutes) to return the scanvenged gear and a new assignment sheet to go back to the showroom and try on gear for themselves and sit on bikes. The goal is to get them to now try on gear that fits them, sit on bikes to experiment with fit, psoture and control operation. Their assignment sheets ask them to record gear sizes and bike types they might choose for protection, clutch effort, seat height, peg location, riding posture, etc. During the trying on/sitting on activities we also take digital candid photos and post them on a website for the student to view later or show their family and friends.

With the Blast in the classroom and a white board on the wall we get the students out of their chairs and have them "build a motorcycle". We go through the controls one by one and have different students take turns drawing each control on a stick figure motorcycle on the board and point it out on the Blast while explaining where it is and how to operate it. Touching/feeling/operating the controls on the Blast is encouraged during this exercise.

During the third session in the classroom on Saturday afternoon we have the students engage in a discussion activity about various low traction conditions and situations. Conducted like a game show, I use three students in the front of the classroom with large flash cards that have preprinted mitigation strategies such as "Use SEE", "No Sudden Brake or Throttle", "Straighten Bike and Coast with Clutch Squeezed", etc to respond to situations I pose to the class. These situations include "the start of a rainstorm", "ice and snow on the roadway", "metal bridge grating", etc.

That same afternoon we ask two volunteers to give a presentation on carrying a passenger. I ask them to use two back to back chairs to simulate a large touring bike and them demonstrate how to mount, start, ride, corner, stop and dismount as a two person riding team. We also use the time to reinforce what each person should be wearing for gear.

We even pass out a written procedure for picking up a fallen motorcycle and have a brief discussion on how it can be done by onseself.

On the final afternoon, after all of the testing has been completed the Instructors lead the students on a discussion about where to go from here and what to do next. Two subjects are covered. The first one is how to get better. We talk about other skilled sports, what those athletes do to get better and how it translates to motorcycling: parking lot practice, tutoring/coaching, books, videos, etc are all mentioned by the students as vehicles in which to learn more and get better. We use some specific pages of the Road Book to choose goals to achieve and dates by when they should be accomplished. We also lead a discussion on finding mentors and role models using personal experiences from each students' past with people whom they have considered as mentors and people whose behavior the wish to emulate.

Our dealership doesn't care whether a student has purchased a Harley or wants to do so. We figure that once they have taken a class with us they will do so if that is the bike they seek. Our goal is to train novice motorcyclists and get them off to a good start. When it is time for them to buy a brand that we sell we hope that they will remember the positive experience they had with their Rider's Edge class at our dealership and that they come to see us; over and over again!

I apologize for the length of my response to your question but I'm quite sure that you received a crappy response when your local dealer could have done so much better. I wish you lived in Omaha so that we could blow you away with a great experience rather than a ho-hum answer to your sincere request for information. I teach both classes here in Nebraska and there is no doubt in my mind which one is superior.
Dave
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gymnast
Moderator
4260 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, Idaho
USA

Harley-Davidson

Sportster Sport

Posted - 08/06/2009 :  5:50 PM
Dave, your answer is not long, it is a comprehensive summary.
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Slammed Low
Female Starting Member
5 Posts


Appleton, WI
USA

Harley-Davidson

883L

Posted - 08/06/2009 :  7:01 PM
No need to apologize for the length of your response. It was perfect-I wish I could go to your RE class! That was exactly the type of answer I was looking for. You sound like someone who really cares and wants students to learn in a fun way.

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aidanspa
Male Advanced Member
1740 Posts
[Mentor]


Omaha, NE
USA

Harley-Davidson

Road King

Posted - 08/06/2009 :  7:50 PM
Welcome to the site Slammed Low!

I took Dave's RE class, and I must say his memory is outstanding. Of course, he has been doing this for a very long time .

The only difference for me was the Saturday afternoon classroom activities as he described them:
quote:
During the third session in the classroom on Saturday afternoon we have the students engage in a discussion activity about various low traction conditions and situations. Conducted like a game show, I use three students in the front of the classroom with large flash cards that have preprinted mitigation strategies such as "Use SEE", "No Sudden Brake or Throttle", "Straighten Bike and Coast with Clutch Squeezed", etc to respond to situations I pose to the class. These situations include "the start of a rainstorm", "ice and snow on the roadway", "metal bridge grating", etc.

That same afternoon we ask two volunteers to give a presentation on carrying a passenger. I ask them to use two back to back chairs to simulate a large touring bike and them demonstrate how to mount, start, ride, corner, stop and dismount as a two person riding team. We also use the time to reinforce what each person should be wearing for gear.

I would have found the highlighted activity very useful and appropriate for a new rider class, but I must have been in the restroom if that took place. The passenger activities would have been interesting, but as a returning new rider I was a long way from needing to worry about carrying a pillion.

I took the marketing effort with a grain of salt as I already had a Road King. I don't know how somebody with no interest in a Harley might have perceived that portion of the class, but hey, it's being conducted at a dealer.

All in all it was a great experience and was all that I expected from the class (very basic stuff). I appreciated that I had considerably more range time than is offered in the DMV's BRC, and I feel as though I got my money's worth.
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JMK
Male Starting Member
3 Posts


Cleveland, Ohio
USA

Honda

Shadow 1100 ACE

Posted - 08/21/2009 :  12:31 AM
I just took the Rider's Edge class this spring and here are some of my thoughts, about it and differences with the BRC class.

First I would like to say that I enjoyed the class and feel that I got what I paid for, and even though some of my following comments are critical it's in the spirit of constructive input. Hopefully I have one or two suggestions that may help improve the program and make it a little better.

I wanted to get into motorcycling for years and finally last January found a good deal on a bike, so I bought it and had to find some training. I looked into the MSF web site and found our local community college had the BRC for $25. Great, so I called but they were not taking reservations until the first week of March for April classes. When I called back the first week of March they had already filled up the classes until August and were not taking any reservations. I heard later that they take walk ins on the first day some times, but there are often wait lists so I went to Rider's Edge at a Harley/Honda Dealer.

So one difference is that the cheap college subsidized classes may be fewer and some what inconvenient to get into, while the dealer is able to add classes to meet demand. Of course the major difference is the cost is $300, but you do get a $25 Gift card for some gear. I got a nice pair of nice leather gloves with the card and a 10% coupon also included.

Another big difference is the bike you learn on.

Boy if that topic hasnt been beaten to death, but here is my piece, I almost liked the Buell Blast...for me...to learn on. I felt the extra power was necessary for me to get it going at all. Since I am a heavyweight I liked the quickness. I also liked the two seats available. Two of the bikes in the class were setup with a shorter seat and they were able to change it to the higher seat quickly. I did not like the clutch function. The friction zone was very small and required quite a slow touch to do smoothly. I agree with the 20mph limiter, if it is being done, since as a newbie I was not used to the feel of how fast I was going and looked down to find myself going too fast once.

I feel the instructors ran the class safely and gave some individual coaching as called for. They said they also taught the local MSF class so the instructors are the same, but some of the class was participant lead instruction with the coaches making sure the major points were made.

Another big difference is the amount of time involved, however not all the extra time is well spent. Some of the extra time on the practice course was useful but some of the inside activities were too Harley related. I would have preferred discussing counter-steering than the history of Harley Davidson or their cool gear.

The first hour was spent on the introduction of the dealer staff, everyone, the owners even flew in from their dealership in the south to be there for the first class of the year. Next the tour, which the dynamiter was cool, but they were not giving away free test runs.

I think the first hour could be better spent on bicycle testing/practice. Get a small banana bike with tall ape hanger handle bars and lets see the class go through the pylons and stop with hand brakes.

We then picked from a stack of cards with old Harleys on them and had to get into line in the order of their age, to get to know each other. I would have rather just spent more time on each person bike choice as we did quickly after the cards. All 12 students had just got a bike or was about to get a specific one.

On the second day I was a little late but nobody noticed since they were all in the dealership trying on gear and filling out a form about what size you take. I FOUND THIS SLIGHLTYOFFENSIVE. oops sorry but since nothing in the gear department fit me I found this another wasted hour.

The third day was mostly on the bike so I was pretty tired at the end, and somewhat sore the next day.

On the fourth day we did practice in the morning and did the testing from 1:00-3:00ish and then the rain started and we quit.

Also we had to come back Monday to finish the in class exercises and the Graduation Party. So while I think they could have spent one more hour yesterday to finish up I understand the desire to make a big deal of the final day of class. We did do a cool little exercise with prism glasses to simulate the effects of drinking on sight and hence balance, and we did an impromptu skit about the pre-ride check. Plus some more videos, I think the use of videos in general was good.

The interest in getting us to become part of the Harley Family was a little creepy; I just do not get it. So I got a Honda.

Also the Riders Edge class gets food! A cake at the end of the class, plus they provide coffee, pastries, lunch and snacks on each table for the full days.

There was a technician on site every day to be sure all bike operated. My Neutral light was out the first day, and I did not know it was supposed to be there since I thought some cheaper bikes do have one. It was a long day of trying to find the neutral and checking by releasing the clutch a little to see if it is in N. The next day he noticed the light and gave me a different bike.

As far as points go in our class one rider got no points, and one lost it on the quick stop and was DQ. I got three points for going out side of the figure eight box. One guy went out side of the square and very slowly rode to almost the far edge of the test area and then managed a slow U-turn and slowly made it back to the exit of the box and only lost three points. Then I did the swerve to a stop ok and got in line for the quick stop. The first person slide at the end so the bike went low and he jumped off over the high side. He was ok but got the DQ. The next guy did fine and then it was my turn. I cranked it up since they said points were assessed for going too slow for anticipating the quick stop. When I hit the brakes I did not remember to pinch the gas tank with my knees so I slide onto the tank providing the required change of COG for a stoppie. Fortunately I came to a stop without an Endo, held my head straight and after I stopped I felt the back tire drop back to the ground and then put my feet down. At some point I had both hit the back brake and the first gear. So I snapped my head over to the left and saw that one of the coaches ran toward me with his arms ready to catch me. Wow what a brave guy to get in front of some 700+ pounds of meat and machine, flipping over or not. These guys do a great job and deserve a lot of credit to do this all summer long. But, since I was only using one brake I did not stop in the distance required, three points. Since I did not drop the bike I guess it was OK. On the last test I was going too slow and not smooth enough so I lost seven points giving me a lucky thirteen points. I was not the worst but no one failed on points or the paper test.

I would have liked to take some more practice time after the test seeing that I did rent the bike for the full day. We could have done unsupervised practice for several hours.

Both classes qualify one for the Ohio motorcycle endorsement, but the coaches did recommend more PLP practice even though we were legally allowed on the freeways.

Overall I would give the class I took an 9 out of 10. I got the basic information I needed and instruction on what to practice to gain the skill needed to ride safely. I got the feel of riding on a smaller bike and am working on relating it all to the VT1100 in my garage, but that is another thread. Either class will provide these basic requirements, it is what you do with the short amount of experience that is what will tell if you want to live to become a safe old rider or die a young squid statistic.

I do not know this but I think the RE demographic is older so the average age in the class was higher than a community college class. Also the cost difference may help attract more serious students, you would think, but it does not account for the safety issues that seem to hound the RE. Everyone in my class was serious and acted as safely as possible.

Thats my first post, jmk.
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Axiom2000
Male Moderator
1761 Posts
[Mentor]


Georgetown, Delaware
USA

BMW

F 800 GT

Posted - 08/21/2009 :  8:33 AM
quote:
I cranked it up since they said points were assessed for going too slow for anticipating the quick stop.



I use to be amazed at how things can be misinterpreted, note I wrote use to. Simply telling students they will lose points for not going quick enough in the Quick Stop Evaluation is almost guaranteeing a disaster. During the evaluation, emotions are running high, nerves are on edge without advising of minimum and maximum speeds needed, students are left to their own judgement to make sure they go quick enough. That quick enough is usually way too fast, that coupled with the desire to stop as quick as possible is usually followed by a front wheel lock and a nasty Low Side fall.

I see more automatic failures for falling or dropping in the quick stop because coaches are not specific enough with the language used in the evaluation pre-brief.
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aidanspa
Male Advanced Member
1740 Posts
[Mentor]


Omaha, NE
USA

Harley-Davidson

Road King

Posted - 08/21/2009 :  10:08 AM
Welcome to the site JMK! Thanks for the detailed description of your RE experience and for sharing your impressions of it with us.

Looking forward to your continued participation.
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asor
Male Starting Member
4 Posts


Hockessin, DE
USA

Vespa

GTS 250

Posted - 11/08/2009 :  9:24 AM
Hi everyone,

I just joined and this is my first post to any website.

I'm also a newbie to riding and just purchased a Vespa Scooter for my daily commute. "If you can ride a bicycle you can ride a scooter" was the guidance I was given. After riding my first 1,000 miles I discovered this is a dangerously true statement. What I didn't understand was for the first few rides I had just enough "skill" to get into trouble. Fortunateley, nothing serious but a few close calls that made me search out a local parking lot and practice, practice, practice and to look for professional instruction.

Since I purchased the scooter at the end of the season, the last state (Delaware) course was filled up. They start up again in March and from what I hear it's very difficult to get in because classes fill up quickly.

There is one final Riders Edge course available next weekend that has an opening after which they won't start up again until March.

So my question is should I take the Riders course or wait until DMV offers courses next year? By the way, the main difference here, in addition to the posted replies, is that for the DMV course I can use my Scooter. I spoke to the Rider's Instructor and he told me that you HAVE to use their bike for the course. I don't own a Harley and don't intend to purchase a clutch operated cycle (the wife has a vote here), I wonder if learning to clutch will confuse me when riding the Vespa and should I wait for the DMV courses and keep practicing on my own.

I intend to use the scooter for my daily ride and save the car for the real nasty weather days. I said "intend" because I'm not sure how cold I can go. This past week the coldest morning temp was 29 and I was toasty with my new Tourmaster bright yellow jacket, only problem is the eyeglass and visor fogging/icing, but I'll save that for another post.

I'm looking forward to anyone's reccomendations about this.

Thanks



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Axiom2000
Male Moderator
1761 Posts
[Mentor]


Georgetown, Delaware
USA

BMW

F 800 GT

Posted - 11/08/2009 :  3:04 PM
I think it would be beneficial to take the class on the equipment you own and intend to ride. I have taught a few classes with students riding their own scooters and it worked out well.

We usually get the schedules posted and open up registration for classes early in February. Keep an eye out here.

http://www.dmv.de.gov/mctraining.ej...CastleNovice

If you are still a member of this site at the time, and give me a heads up reminder I can let you know a little before the date that class sign ups will be available. Also just an FYI the classes held in Dover and Georgetown don't fill up near as quick as New Castle. If you don't mind a little drive that is an option.

In the mean time practice as much as possible. Try to stay on the back roads or neighborhood streets, I am assuming you have either a learners permit or an M endorsement now.

Thanks
Jerry
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asor
Male Starting Member
4 Posts


Hockessin, DE
USA

Vespa

GTS 250

Posted - 11/09/2009 :  5:45 PM
Thanks Jerry

I have my permit and plan to take the road test soon. I'll send you a heads-up in 2010

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dino.999
Starting Member
2 Posts


williamsburg, va
USA

Yamaha

Posted - 11/09/2009 :  6:39 PM
JMK , as an MSF RiderCoach I can tell you that you did not get penalized for not using the rear braks as it is an additional 5 points.You would have accumulated 8 points. Also we have to tell you " You will accumulate points for not attaining proper speed" as it is on the cards .At this point in the day , someone still may not be willing to go 12 - 17 mph and will be a real hazard to themselves on the road. That is part of the process.
Dean
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dhalen32
Male Moderator
844 Posts
[Mentor]


Omaha, NE
USA

BMW

R1200RT

Posted - 11/10/2009 :  6:06 AM
quote:
Originally posted by asor

Hi everyone,

I just joined and this is my first post to any website.

I'm also a newbie to riding and just purchased a Vespa Scooter for my daily commute. "If you can ride a bicycle you can ride a scooter" was the guidance I was given. After riding my first 1,000 miles I discovered this is a dangerously true statement. What I didn't understand was for the first few rides I had just enough "skill" to get into trouble. Fortunateley, nothing serious but a few close calls that made me search out a local parking lot and practice, practice, practice and to look for professional instruction.

Since I purchased the scooter at the end of the season, the last state (Delaware) course was filled up. They start up again in March and from what I hear it's very difficult to get in because classes fill up quickly.

There is one final Riders Edge course available next weekend that has an opening after which they won't start up again until March.

So my question is should I take the Riders course or wait until DMV offers courses next year? By the way, the main difference here, in addition to the posted replies, is that for the DMV course I can use my Scooter. I spoke to the Rider's Instructor and he told me that you HAVE to use their bike for the course. I don't own a Harley and don't intend to purchase a clutch operated cycle (the wife has a vote here), I wonder if learning to clutch will confuse me when riding the Vespa and should I wait for the DMV courses and keep practicing on my own.

I intend to use the scooter for my daily ride and save the car for the real nasty weather days. I said "intend" because I'm not sure how cold I can go. This past week the coldest morning temp was 29 and I was toasty with my new Tourmaster bright yellow jacket, only problem is the eyeglass and visor fogging/icing, but I'll save that for another post.

I'm looking forward to anyone's reccomendations about this.

Thanks







Asor:
Good question! Welcome to the forum. I have a few questions for you: Can you afford to take both courses? Does Delaware allow you to ride with your learner's permit unescorted? Depending upon your answers, I would consider taking the Rider's Edge course available to you now and then taking the state sponsored course in the Spring on your own machine.

Like Axiom, I see real benefit to learning how to maneuver your own machine with someone watching and coaching your performance. However, if you are required to be escorted to legally ride on your learner's permit then it might be wise to take a class sooner, rather than later if you have no one looking after you while on public roads and highways. Whatever you decide, enjoy your new Vespa.
Dave
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dino.999
Starting Member
2 Posts


williamsburg, va
USA

Yamaha

Posted - 11/12/2009 :  6:21 PM
DHalen , you can go to MSCV.ORG and check out our MSF Scooter courses offered year round in Richmond , VA.
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dhalen32
Male Moderator
844 Posts
[Mentor]


Omaha, NE
USA

BMW

R1200RT

Posted - 11/13/2009 :  5:50 AM
quote:
Originally posted by dino.999

DHalen , you can go to MSCV.ORG and check out our MSF Scooter courses offered year round in Richmond , VA.



Thanks Dino. I went to your website but only found Jump Start, BRC and combined IRC/ERC classes. Where is the information on scooter courses. I assume you were referring to the MSF Scooter School I. Correct?
Dave
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JMK
Male Starting Member
3 Posts


Cleveland, Ohio
USA

Honda

Shadow 1100 ACE

Posted - 11/22/2009 :  9:17 PM
Adianspa: hi and thanks for the welcome!

Asor: I agree that you should get the MSF training on the type of vehicle you will be riding. If you wait until next year for a course, you can still study the MSF materials to get better educated about the rules of the road. Also I found reading the Proficient Motorcycling books very helpful. And PLP.

Dino.999: I think I did hit the back break and the downshifted as I grabbed both the levers, but the quick stop caused my body to shift forward, lifting the rear wheel, hence less breaking power so I exceeded the stopping distance. And I was docked 3 points.

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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17311 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 11/22/2009 :  9:27 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
quote:
...so I slide onto the tank providing the required change of COG for a stoppie.


It's slid, not slide.

No change of COG is required for a stoppie - just more weight transfer from the rear wheel to the front than exists on the rear wheel.

quote:
...the quick stop caused my body to shift forward, lifting the rear wheel, hence less breaking power so I exceeded the stopping distance.


It's braking, not breaking.

Look, if your rear wheel came off the ground, then you had achieved as much braking power as your bike could deliver. That is, you went slightly beyond a threshold braking effort. This would NOT cause you to have excessive stopping distance - just the opposite.

Ideas such as you expressed above are quite typical of new riders who have yet to put into their minds the dynamics of their motorcycle. Some would call them excuses or rationalizations.
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asor
Male Starting Member
4 Posts


Hockessin, DE
USA

Vespa

GTS 250

Posted - 11/23/2009 :  9:27 PM
Hi everyone and thanks for your comments. I decided to wait for the MSF class that begins again in March in this area. The Harley marketing thing really turned me off.

I did find some basic exercises that I have been practising for the past 2 months. It really helped and I could see the improvements in my riding skills. I took the DMV test last Tuesday and passed, even got a compliment from the DMV guy about how I handled the course, but I ride a scooter so there's no chance for an enlarged ego here.

I'm enjoying the work commute, and event though it takes me longer to get ready in the morning to dress for the cold, its worth it and saving over $40.00 per week in gas money makes it even more fun - although I'm probably spending as much on hot coffee to warm up when I get to the office.
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Axiom2000
Male Moderator
1761 Posts
[Mentor]


Georgetown, Delaware
USA

BMW

F 800 GT

Posted - 11/24/2009 :  4:58 AM
Asor,
There are some very good threads on here recently regarding riding in cold weather. As long as there is no snow or ice I actually prefer the cold to the heat. I just don't do that well wearing ATGATT when it is 90 degrees. I am a big fan of Gerbing heated gear, not sure if the alternator on your scooter is sufficient to handle it but if you are getting really cold it is something worth checking out.

Just a head up the first class in New Castle will be the first weekend in March. Keep checking the web site beginning in early Feb.

Good luck
Jerry
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galileo
Ex-Member

Posted - 11/24/2009 :  5:21 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Axiom2000

Asor,
There are some very good threads on here recently regarding riding in cold weather. As long as there is no snow or ice I actually prefer the cold to the heat. I just don't do that well wearing ATGATT when it is 90 degrees. I am a big fan of Gerbing heated gear, not sure if the alternator on your scooter is sufficient to handle it but if you are getting really cold it is something worth checking out.

Just a head up the first class in New Castle will be the first weekend in March. Keep checking the web site beginning in early Feb.

Good luck
Jerry



Gerbing now has some heated gear that will work for a few hours on batteries. I consider heated gear to be essential for safety in cold weather.
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asor
Male Starting Member
4 Posts


Hockessin, DE
USA

Vespa

GTS 250

Posted - 11/30/2009 :  7:03 PM


I just went to the Gerbings site, http://gerbing.com/ looking for my x-mas present.

I like the 7v battery operated soft shell vest, only problem is its out of stock until 2010, with no date on when it will come in. I will look on this site for info on how others dress for the cold and for any other vest manufacturers. In the meantime its bundle up or drive the cage when the temp drops to freeze nostril hairs.

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