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 All Forums
 Motorcycle Safety
 Sharing of Lessons Learned
 Making a U turn on a steep hill
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firefly
Junior Member
72 Posts


Santa Monica, California
USA

Yamaha

vmax
Peer Review:

Posted - 03/11/2005 :  3:34 AM                       Like
I was making a U turn on a steep hill just after I bought a new 03 bike 640 lbs, it was going to fall and I had to almost brake my leg to prevent that from happening. It did not fall but from that day
I try to avoid that kind of U turn by any means .

firefly

TedGamble
Standard Member
214 Posts


Murfreesboro, TN
USA

Honda

GL1800A

Posted - 03/11/2005 :  7:47 AM
The Mega-Rider uses his superior judgement to avoid situations where he will have to user his superior riding skills.
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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6950 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 03/11/2005 :  5:37 PM
I had lots and lots of practice making the equivalent of a U-turn on dirt bikes when I didn't make it up some hill I wanted to climb. As long as you have enough momentum to get you around to the point where you're pointing down hill, it's not that hard. Of course, it's way easier on a 250 pound motorcycle.

Still, the judgement quote applies. I've learned not to get into awkward situations in the first place (for the most part).
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nomad dan
Advanced Member
1276 Posts


Denver, Colorado
USA

Kawasaki

06 Vulcan Nomad 1600

Posted - 03/14/2005 :  9:42 AM
In slow speed maneuvers such as the U-turn mentioned, usually at the point where your instinct is telling you to put your foot down is the exact point where you need to give it a little more gas. It seems to go against instinct, but if you do give it more gas rather than put your foot down you should be okay, assuming you have left yourself enough room to complete the maneuver
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marsam
Male Advanced Member
510 Posts
[Mentor]


Birkirkara
Malta

Yamaha

Dragstar & Vmax

Posted - 03/15/2005 :  8:39 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
I guess Nomad Dan's method is right on. The other thing that your instinct tells you to do when you are in this situation it to look down or at least not on the horizon but rather close to the front wheel's path. This should also be avoided. However it is not easy to do so when you feel the weight of the bike is about to take its toll.
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Aero
Standard Member
157 Posts


Providence, RI
USA

Honda

Shadow Aero 750

Posted - 03/15/2005 :  6:08 PM
quote:
Originally posted by nomad dan

In slow speed maneuvers such as the U-turn mentioned, usually at the point where your instinct is telling you to put your foot down is the exact point where you need to give it a little more gas.


I couldn't agree more. That is exactly when you want to give a little more gas and/or less clutch. Of course, natural reaction is to put your foot down.
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TedGamble
Standard Member
214 Posts


Murfreesboro, TN
USA

Honda

GL1800A

Posted - 03/16/2005 :  8:49 AM
quote:
In slow speed maneuvers such as the U-turn mentioned, usually at the point where your instinct is telling you to put your foot down is the exact point where you need to give it a little more gas. It seems to go against instinct, but if you do give it more gas rather than put your foot down you should be okay, assuming you have left yourself enough room to complete the maneuver.


So true. When you're on a 900 pound bike, putting your foot down in a situation like this can lead to broken and twisted body parts (and I'm not talking about motorcycle body parts ).
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Phu Cat
Starting Member
6 Posts


USA

Posted - 03/17/2005 :  4:47 PM
You will likely find, if you are right handed, making sharp left turns are easiest for you, and visa-versa. It's imperitive to be able to make sharp turns in both directions. If you practice making sharp, slow speed turns, you'll quickly find yourself getting better at it. You'll also find riding the clutch thru a turn like this adds to your stability if you're a fairly good rider to begin with. If the clutch still scares you, that's where you ned to start practicing.

PC
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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6950 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 03/17/2005 :  7:19 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Phu Cat

You will likely find, if you are right handed, making sharp left turns are easiest for you, and visa-versa.


I thought it had more to do with which hand has hold of the throttle. If the throttle is on the right, left turns will be easier and if it's on the left, right turns will be easier.
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BadaBing
Male Advanced Member
1196 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Harley-Davidson

Heritage Classic 04

Posted - 03/20/2005 :  10:55 PM
Hi Firefly,

You didn't mention if you were going up or down the hill. All the comments you got were gems. The only thing that I would add that makes these types of u turns go smoothly is to rotate you head around in the direction of the u turn. It is amazing how your body and bike will follow.

And the other thing I do is to use my body as a counter weight while I am in the turn to prevent it from falling.

Ciao,

BadaBing
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nomad dan
Advanced Member
1276 Posts


Denver, Colorado
USA

Kawasaki

06 Vulcan Nomad 1600

Posted - 03/21/2005 :  9:48 AM
I’ve got to second what Badabing said, looking where you want to end up is very important and its good he put in what we left out. I might add that you want to turn your head and look so far around that it will feel exaggerated until you’re used to doing it. If you were going straight north and wanted to do a u-turn, then as you were about to lean over and start your turn, get your head as far around as you can and look at the area you want to end up at in the south lane and keep looking there till your around.

If you tried it in a chair at the computer, unless your young and limber its probably natural to look at the 9 or 10 o’clock position, try looking at the 6 or 7 o'clock position. If you do that on your bike, your turn will be tighter; it has more impact than you’d think.
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