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 Preventative Maintenance
 Winter Storage - Fogging Oil
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WSMeders
Male Standard Member
118 Posts


Columbus, OH
USA

Yamaha

FZR600

Posted - 10/15/2009 :  8:43 AM                       Like
Anyone have much experience using fogging oil?
My FZRs manual recommends a tablespoon of oil in each cylinder, but if fogging oil does what it says (coat the whole internals, intake to exhaust) it seems like the best bet for winter storage prep.

Night Train
Male Advanced Member
1668 Posts
[Mentor]


Sydney, Nova Scotia
Canada

Kawasaki

2006 VN900

Peer Review: 2

Posted - 10/15/2009 :  2:01 PM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Fogging oil should work just as well as clean engine oil. Here are some other winter storage tips:

Storing your bike for winter

Well, it's that time of year again! Soon the snow will be falling and the motorcycles will be tucked away for the winter

And each spring your dealer's phone will ring off the wall with customers who did not store the ol' bike properly and now wonder why it won't run.

Some preparation now will ensure that you are out riding in the spring instead of waiting in the dealer's lineup.


1. Location - where are you going to put it?

One solution may be to ask your dealer if he offers a storage program. This is ideal because he will often prep, store, and have the bike ready to ride when you are ready again. If you decide to store it yourself, you will need a place that is dry and out of harm's way.

When possible. Chose a location away from windows. The ultraviolet light can fade paint and plastic parts. Direct sunlight can raise the ambient temperature of the storage area which will promote condensation when the sun goes down, so cover plain glass with some sort of opaque material. Also, cover your bike with a specially designed bike cover not a sheet or a tarp. Why? Because a sheet absorbs moisture and hold it against metal surfaces and then rust forms. Also, damp fabric will breed mildew and this may attack the seat material. A tarp prevents moisture from getting in but it also prevents it from getting out. Moisture trapped will condense on the bike and then the rust monster is back!

A specially designed motorcycle cover is made of a mildew resistant material. The material is slightly porous, so it can breathe.



2. Change The Oil

Tip: Just like cars a colder winter grade oil will allow your bike to start easier in colder weather. If your motorcycle runs ok with a cold winter grade oil (5w30) then changing the oil to this grade will help startup and running in spring.

Even if the oil is not due for a change, byproducts of combustion produce acids in the oil which will harm the inner metal surfaces. Warm the engine to its normal operating temperature, as warm oil drains much faster and more completely.

While you are at it, why not change the filter too? Add fresh motorcycle grade oil. Remember to dispose of the drained oil and old filter in a responsible manner. What to do with the old oil? Recycle it. Most stores you have purchased the oil from will take it back free of change to be recycled.




3. Add Fuel Stabilizer And Drain Carbs

Tip: You only need to drain the carbs if your motorcycle will be stored more than 4 months. Otherwise just add fuel stabilizer to the gas tank, run the bike for 10 minutes so it mixes and gets into the carbs.

Fill the tank with fresh fuel, but do not overfill. The correct level is when the fuel just touches the bottom of the filler neck. This gives enough room for the fuel to expand without overflowing the tank when temperature rises.

Shut off the fuel petcock and drain the carburetors and the fuel lines. Add winterizing fuel conditioner to prevent the fuel from going stale, and help prevent moisture accumulation. Stale fuel occurs when aromatics (the lighter additives) evaporate leaving a thicker, sour smelling liquid. If left long enough, it will turn into a gum, plugging the jets and passages inside your carbs!



4. Lube the cylinder(s)

Tip: You only need to do this if your motorcycle will be stored a very long time (6 months or more)

Because gasoline is an excellent solvent and the oil scraper ring has done its job, most of the oil from the cylinder walls have been removed since the last time the engine was run. If the cylinder wall is left unprotected for a long period of time, it will rust and cause premature piston and ring wear.

Remove the spark plugs and pour a tablespoon (5 cc) of clean engine oil or spray fogging oil into each cylinder. Be sure to switch off the fuel before you crank the engine or else you may refill the drained carbs! Also, ground the ignition leads to prevent sparks igniting any fuel residue. Turn the engine over several revolutions to spread the oil around and then reinstall the plugs. Refitting the plugs before cranking the engine could result in a hydraulic lock if too much oil was used in the cylinder.



5. Battery Storage

The battery must be removed from the motorcycle when it is in storage. Motorcycles often have a small current drain even when the ignition is switched off (dark current), and a discharged battery will sulfate and no longer be able to sustain a charge.

A conventional battery should be checked for electrolyte level. Add distilled water to any of the cells that are low and then charge the battery.

Battery charging should be performed at least every two weeks using a charger that has an output of 10% of the battery ampere hour rating. For example if the battery has an AH rating of 12 (e.g. 12N12A-4A-1 where the 12A is 12 amp hours), then the charge rate of that battery should not exceed 1.2 amps. A higher charge will cause the battery to overheat. Charge the battery away from open flame or sparks as the gas (hydrogen) given off a battery can be explosive. Elevate the battery and keep it from freezing. Exercise the proper caution appropriate to caustic substances.



6. Surface Preparation

Waxing and polishing the motorcycle might seem like a waste of time since you are putting it away and no one will see it. But applying wax is a very important part of storing a motorcycle.Wax will act as a barrier against rust and moisture.

Don't forget to spray any other metal surfaces (such as the frame or engine) will a very light spray of WD-40. This will keep these areas shiny and protect from corrosion as well.



7. Exhaust and Mufflers

Exhausts/Mufflers are known to rust fast when they are not used. So making sure they are properly stored for the winter on your bike will save them from an early rusty death. Spray a light oil (such as WD40) into the muffler ends and drain holes. Lightly stick a plastic bag (shopping bag is fine) into the end of each muffler hole (to keep moisture from getting inside the exhaust). Then cover each muffler with another plastic bag to keep outside moisture off.



8. Tires

Check both front and rear tires with your air pressure gauge. Make sure each tire is properly inflated to the maximum recommend pressure. As it gets colder, air condenses in your tire so it is important to pump them up as to keep your tires healthy. Rubber is a flexible material and does not like to freeze (it cracks when it freezes). Placing 1/4"-1/2" piece of cardboard or wood board under each tire will help keep the rubber raised up from a freezing floor.

DO NOT use a tire dressing on tires (such as Armor-All or tire cleaning foam) as this will make the tires hard and slippery.



9. Service all fluids

If the brake or clutch fluids haven't been changed in the last two years or 18,000 km (11,000 miles), do it now. The fluids used In these system are "hygroscopic" which means that they absorb moisture. The contaminated fluid will cause corrosion inside the systems which may give problems when the motorcycle is used next spring. Be sure to use the correct fluids and note the warnings and instructions in the service manual. If you don't have the experience to service these systems, contact your dealer, he will be happy to assist you.

If your motorcycle is liquid cooled, the coolant requires changing every two years or 24,000 kms (15,000 miles). Make sure that the engine is cool enough to rest your hand on it before draining the system and please dispose of the coolant responsibly. Coolant/antifreeze is available from your dealer and has been developed to provide the correct protection for your motorcycle engine. Mixed 50/50 with distilled water will ensure a clean system for the next two years or 24,000 kms (15,000 miles).



10. Cover it.

Now you can cover the bike with the cycle cover and look forward to the first warm day of spring.



Back On The Road

Before you head out onto the highway, there are a couple of things to do. First, remove the cover and put it where you can find it again. Talking of finding things, locate the (charged) battery and reinstall it connecting the positive (+) cable (red) before the (-) negative and covering the terminals with the plastic covers. Recheck all fluid levels and turn on the fuel. Check for anything wrong on the motorcycle (cracked tires, broken parts/plastic, leaking oil). Set the tire pressures back to riding specs and you are ready to fire up.

As you don your riding gear, remember that your riding skills will be a little rusty and the road surfaces will have changed a bit since the last ride, so go carefully. Sand/salt deposits on the edge of the road and especially at corners may be hazardous.
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WarHawk
Male Advanced Member
1796 Posts


Baytown, Texas
USA

Yamaha

'07 V-Star Custom

Posted - 10/19/2009 :  11:50 AM
Marvels Mystery oil in a FULL tank of gas.

Born in Chicago in 1923, Marvel Mystery Oil was developed to combat deposits on carburetors caused by poorly refined gasoline of the age. Marvels popularity soared as word spread of its effectiveness in treating all types of engine ailments and was used extensively in WWII on everything from airplanes to battleships to tanks. Today, Marvel Mystery Oil provides vehicle owners the ability to solve scores of automotive ailments with one product that can be added to both oil and fuel.

ADDED TO GAS OR DIESEL:
Marvel Mystery Oil lubricates the entire fuel system-fuel pumps, fuel injectors or carburetors and the top-portion of the cylinders. These are areas, that by design, motor oil does not reach. Using Marvel Mystery Oil in your fuel extends the life of these vital components by providing them with lubrication that fuel alone does not provide

http://www.marvelmysteryoil.com/ind...hp/site/faq/
Can I use MMO for winter storage as a fuel stabilizer?
Yes, you can use MMO as a fuel stabilizer. Use 4ozs of Marvel for every 10 gallons of fuel.

A. It will lubricate everything from the carbs thru the engine.
B. It stabilizes the fuel so it won't sour out as bad
C. It keeps the seals and other rubber components from dry rotting if the gasoline happens to evaporate out of the float bowl or lines.
D. Tastes great, and is less filling (haha...just checking to see if you are still reading)

I put it in my lawn mower..I do live in Houston..but I left it in the back yard all winter long with no cover on it...the next spring when I needed it...just topped of the gas tank with fresh fuel/MMO, it fired up like it had never been sitting...other than smoking a bit more than normal for a few minutes..after that...ran like a champ!

I mix my own "special concoction" and put 2oz (about 1/4 cup) each time I fill up my bike tank

This guy has a great site as well
http://www.dansmc.com/winterize.htm
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Indiana Randy
Moderator
2118 Posts
[Mentor]


Fort Wayne, Indiana
USA

Honda

2000 Magna V4 750

Posted - 10/19/2009 :  1:47 PM
Warhawk, I never thought to use MMO as a fuel stabilizer. Huh? Don't think I will since I'm sold on StaBil in the tank (double the dose) with no issues EVER in many years. I DO run some MMO in the crankcase before an oil change though...add some a couple hundred miles prior to the oil change at the same time of pouring a half bottle of Chevron Tectron in the gas tank. This cleans out the crankcase AND the fuel system prior to the oil change. It's also a good time to change the plugs.


OK, too much info.... I almost forgot about the magical properties of MMO.
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Indiana Randy
Moderator
2118 Posts
[Mentor]


Fort Wayne, Indiana
USA

Honda

2000 Magna V4 750

Posted - 10/19/2009 :  1:57 PM
Night Train, good list. To which I submit be added;

Loosen, clean, apply dielectric grease to every electrical connection you can reach/find.

Apply silicone to all rubber parts and hoses. (Except tires)

Check all bulbs and replace as needed.

Lube all control cables.

Feel every bolt, nut, screw, electrical connection and make sure they are snug.

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WarHawk
Male Advanced Member
1796 Posts


Baytown, Texas
USA

Yamaha

'07 V-Star Custom

Posted - 10/20/2009 :  11:41 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Indiana Randy

Warhawk, I never thought to use MMO as a fuel stabilizer. Huh? Don't think I will since I'm sold on StaBil in the tank (double the dose) with no issues EVER in many years. I DO run some MMO in the crankcase before an oil change though...add some a couple hundred miles prior to the oil change at the same time of pouring a half bottle of Chevron Tectron in the gas tank. This cleans out the crankcase AND the fuel system prior to the oil change. It's also a good time to change the plugs.


OK, too much info.... I almost forgot about the magical properties of MMO.



Ya know never did I...until I saw it work just fine on my old lawnmower that I had really neglected...you wouldn't treat a motorcycle this bad for sure (I left it in the back yard uncovered all winter long!!) Yet it fired right up!

Thats why I mix my own magic oil

1 quart Dexron III
1 quart MMO
1 Pint Seafoam

Buy yah...StaBil is formulated JUST for that purpose so go with what ya know...maybe a double dose of StaBil and MMO might help too!


Then put a 1/4 cup per 10 gallons...

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Night Train
Male Advanced Member
1668 Posts
[Mentor]


Sydney, Nova Scotia
Canada

Kawasaki

2006 VN900

Posted - 10/20/2009 :  2:24 PM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
quote:
Originally posted by Indiana Randy

Night Train, good list. To which I submit be added;

Loosen, clean, apply dielectric grease to every electrical connection you can reach/find.

Apply silicone to all rubber parts and hoses. (Except tires)

Check all bulbs and replace as needed.

Lube all control cables.

Feel every bolt, nut, screw, electrical connection and make sure they are snug.



Excellent suggestions Randy. Thanks.
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rayg50
Male Moderator
2083 Posts
[Mentor]


NYC, NY
USA

Honda

Shadow Spirit 750DC

Posted - 11/18/2009 :  8:10 PM
A great thread. My thanks to all.

Not quite sure how to phrase this question but here goes. NYC winters have highs above freezing most days. How often / how much winter riding, in your opinion , would eliminate the need to winterize a bike?


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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6943 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 11/18/2009 :  8:25 PM
quote:
Originally posted by rayg50

How often / how much winter riding, in your opinion , would eliminate the need to winterize a bike?
If you can get out at least once a month for 20 minutes or more, there is no need to winterize the bike. That's what I've set as a goal for my 888, which I don't ride much. The other two get ridden weekly most weeks.
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1716 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 11/18/2009 :  9:08 PM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Ray, I'm just down I-95 60 miles from you. I ride all winter, mostly. My bike will sit for a long week every month, and those times when the roads are slippery.

I still use stabil and/or startron to keep the gas fresh. Even a 10 day layoff in sub freezing weather can cause the battery to be a little sluggish, if not on a battery tender. Even if the roads are clean, any melting snow piles will cause little streams of water nicely mixed with salt to make a mess of the bike. Don't forget the cold will drop the tire pressure.

If you start it now and then, and not ride, let it fully warm or you'll just ensure moisture got in the engine, mufflers etc.

I guess my answer is, you still have to winterize it somewhat, even if you intend to ride it now and then.
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