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 New chain & sprockets.
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1716 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit
Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 03/13/2010 :  10:21 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend                        Like
I haven't had a chain drive bike in 25 years, but I do now. I have been pretty good about lubing the chain (Dupont Telfon stuff), but honestly not so good about actually cleaning the chain.

It's a 530 chain, and that's a hefty size. It's an endless chain with a riiveted link, not a clip style. At about 24,000 miles, I've noticed several kinked links, and some telltale red dust on the inside of the links. Either, or both a sure sign of needing replacement. I do ride year round in CT, and I'm sure the sand and salt residue on the road doesn't help chain life.

I replaced both sprockets at the same time, as advised by almost everyone when changing the chain. I really did NOT notice any obvious wear on the steel teeth.

My front sprocket has a large washer with one side of it flattened against the flat of the nut. That nut can be hard to unscrew, but mine wasn't particularly, at least with a foot long breaker bar. Loosen that nut BEFORE you take off the chain though, and I used a 2x3 between the wheel spokes and swingarm to keep the chain from spinning as I loosened the sprocket nut. If you have 2 people, I suppose someone applying rear break pressure would work.

On a large 530 chain, almost all of the rivet link remover tools recommend grinding the pins before trying to push the pins out of the sideplate.

I had a remover tool, and I had a homemade rivet tool, but I was baffled as to how hard installing the side plate onto the pins was. I bent the handle on my C-clamp trying. Even with all the X rings, pins and plates slathered in the supplied grease. It's a D.I.D chain, and clip style master links are just not available. I bought a chain tool kit and it has a plate installer adapter that worked well. Pressing the pins onto the plates was easy with the tool, and I took care to go a little at a time in order not to press too tightly.

The chain and sprockets cost me $220. The tool kit was $89. A 32mm socket was $9. Ask around, one of your buddies may have the chain tools. The job wasn't all that hard, but, this is one job having the right tool for the job makes all the difference.

Got the chain on, staight and the correct slack, and checked my rear pads for wear. I'm good to go, except for this rain storm. I promise to do better with cleaning as well as lubing THIS chain!

rkfire
Advanced Member
1716 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 03/28/2010 :  1:10 PM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
One more tip I had seen in Motorcyclist and had forgotten it.

My chain ended up being very tight, even though I thought I was being precise. The problem was, when I was tightening the axle nut, I tightened by turning the socket wrench in clockwise circles. Enough force was used towards the rear of the bike, that the chain tightened as I pushed the wrench.

Their tip was to use the wrench to tighten the axle nut towards the engine, so as to keep the axle tight against the adjusters. In other words, my chain is on the left so I should push the wrench clockwise from the 5 O'clock to 8 O'clock position.
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IronHenry
Male Junior Member
35 Posts


Phoenix, AZ
USA

Honda

'88 Magna

Posted - 07/01/2010 :  2:10 AM
quote:
Originally posted by rkfire

One more tip I had seen in Motorcyclist and had forgotten it.

My chain ended up being very tight, even though I thought I was being precise. The problem was, when I was tightening the axle nut, I tightened by turning the socket wrench in clockwise circles. Enough force was used towards the rear of the bike, that the chain tightened as I pushed the wrench.

Their tip was to use the wrench to tighten the axle nut towards the engine, so as to keep the axle tight against the adjusters. In other words, my chain is on the left so I should push the wrench clockwise from the 5 O'clock to 8 O'clock position.

I've had this problem before as well and yes pushing the wrench toward the bike helps a lot. I've worked on a few bikes over the years that even this didn't solve the problem though.

An instructor for one of the courses I took, who's been wrenching for years, and who's skill I trust, showed me an easy way to prevent this completely. It sounds kind of hokey, but here it is: If you take a screwdriver with a normal sized round shaft and place it between the chain and the rear sprocket and then rotate the rear wheel until the screw driver is at the back of the sprocket, it puts enough tension on the chain to hold the axle against the adjusters pretty much no matter what. This is assuming there's no pipes or anything in the way. If you're not comfortable doing this, then don't, but if you've properly adjusted your chain tension, there's really no way this would ever bend the output shaft on the engine.

The most reliable method for adjusting chain tension that I've found is to line up the front sprocket, the swing arm pivot, and the rear axle. This is the point in the swing arm's travel where the chain will be at it's tightest. I use a ratcheting tie down over the rear seat or sub frame or fender support (make sure it's a structural piece and not the fender that will bend or plastic that will break) attached to the swing arm or the bike lift. Someone heavy sitting on the bike works in a pinch. Rotate the rear wheel until you find the tightest point on the chain, and then adjust for a couple millimeters play at the center of the chain.

I don't claim to be an expert or anything, but I have pick up some stuff along the way. I hope this helps someone.
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