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 UPDATE: Road test on Sept 26th...And I Passed
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AaronC
Male Standard Member
102 Posts


Windsor, Ontario
Canada

Honda

1984 Magna vf700c

Posted - 09/04/2013 :  2:43 PM                       Like
So I booked it today,

I'm pretty excited, though I'm hoping they don't hassle me as I booked the full speed motorcycle test and will be showing up on my scooter (which the ownership has classified as a full speed bike).

Other than that I'm pretty confident I'll do well.

I just wish I hadn't taken this long to get licensed.

Edited by - AaronC on 09/26/2013 4:25 PM

scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6943 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 09/04/2013 :  3:54 PM
Do you know what exactly is involved in the test?

In California, you can find YouTube videos that walk you through the entire test. My son-in-law had a motorcycle license at one time, and owned a few bikes, but after moving through four different states it somehow got dropped off of his license. He knows how to ride and we've been on a few rides. But I took him over to the local DMV office after hours to see how well he could do on the riding test and he had problems on a couple of different parts of it. After giving him a few hints and repeating everything four times, he had no trouble at all.

My point being that the California test is tricky enough that even experienced riders can have problems with it the first time.

It's probably a good idea to find out what's involved in your test to make sure that you're ready for it.
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1716 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 09/05/2013 :  8:21 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
In Ontario Canada, the test is an actual road test, just like a car.

I think they have a better system.

A written test, eye exam gets you a M1 permit, which allows practice and some experience, while prohibited from carrying a passenger, ride on 400's highways (equivalent to Interstate highways), day light riding only, and zero alcohol.

Between 60 and 90 days, you have to take the road test, OR a course certificate.

Passing that, you get an M2 license, no road or time of day limitations but zero alcohol still.

Within 22 months to 5 years, you can take the road test for the full M license.

Mopeds, and 3 wheelers have their own licensing designation.
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AaronC
Male Standard Member
102 Posts


Windsor, Ontario
Canada

Honda

1984 Magna vf700c

Posted - 09/05/2013 :  10:53 AM
quote:
Originally posted by scottrnelson

Do you know what exactly is involved in the test?

In California, you can find YouTube videos that walk you through the entire test. My son-in-law had a motorcycle license at one time, and owned a few bikes, but after moving through four different states it somehow got dropped off of his license. He knows how to ride and we've been on a few rides. But I took him over to the local DMV office after hours to see how well he could do on the riding test and he had problems on a couple of different parts of it. After giving him a few hints and repeating everything four times, he had no trouble at all.

My point being that the California test is tricky enough that even experienced riders can have problems with it the first time.

It's probably a good idea to find out what's involved in your test to make sure that you're ready for it.



1- Walk your bike in a figure 8 (engine off)
2- Go through a slalom and when you reach the end you come back again through a slalom.
3- go on a straight line through cones 1 meter apart till the end and come back outside of the cones in a straight line to a complete stop on a marked white line.
4- you will be asked to name the parts on your bike eg light switch, right and left brake levers, horn etc. (Nothing about engine or transmission).
5- You will be asked to turn your signals on and beep your horn.
6- after completing all that you will be asked to go on the road for a series of turns (right and left turns signaling while doing them and looking right and left).

The only thing I'm not 100% on is the slalom and I'm looking for a place to practice it with some decent road markings. I'm thinking of running through a parking lot and using the spaces since I'm on a very small bike and IIRC, the cones are placed 4.3 meters apart (approx 12 or 13 feet), and parking spaces are quite a bit narrower than that.

As for the road test, I'm more than confident about that as I've been riding on two wheels in traffic (though just a bicycle) since the age of 12, and I'm an ardent opponent to sidewalk cycling. I also moved from Windsor, ON to Sudbury, ON on a mountain bike, so traffic intimidation is a null factor. I'm actually more comfortable on the scooter than I am in my car as I feel a lot more aware of my surroundings, and I've developed a habit of checking my mirrors constantly in any vehicle over the years.

My commute to work involves a lot of roads that don't handle much volume, though one is a private road owned by Ford, where people tend to think they can do 100km/h if they want, however, when I know that nobody is behind me, I like to try and come to a complete stop as quick as possible (not quite a panic stop but a quick stop) and make sure that my front wheel stops in the marked line, not before and not after, with smooth and constant braking pressure.

As for the riding through a narrow path, on the road that my work is on, there's a tar line approx 2ft (less than a meter) from the edge of the road. Despite being a gravel shoulder the road is kept fairly clean (right tire track happens to be within it as the road is narrow), I tend to ride between the tar line and the white line at the end of the road.

Besides that list, I think there is a collision avoidance portion where you have to ride toward the instructor and (s)he will point in a direction and you need to quickly turn 90 degrees in that direction. That should be ok, I'm more comfortable turning at speed than slowly, but have been working on my slow(er) speed counter steering, since reading the tip on counter-steering vs leaning/counter-weighing, and have been more aware that I've been doing that incorrectly, and thankfully, I feel a lot more stable counter steering, than when I was simply leaning the turn.

If there's anything I should be focusing on differently, any pointers would be appreciated, of course.
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rayg50
Male Moderator
2083 Posts
[Mentor]


NYC, NY
USA

Honda

Shadow Spirit 750DC

Posted - 09/26/2013 :  6:50 PM
Congratulations on passing your road test!!

How about some details and how passing changes what you can and cannot legally do now.

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AaronC
Male Standard Member
102 Posts


Windsor, Ontario
Canada

Honda

1984 Magna vf700c

Posted - 09/26/2013 :  11:58 PM
Yes Rayg50,

Sorry, I was at work when I edited the topic and meant to provide details so here goes.

I registered at the DriveTest center, they took my license and my temporary M1 license (issued when I did the written test and valid for 90 days so they only provide a temp for this step). The counter-lady directed me to stand in the back next to my bike after I ran outside to verify my license plate number that I had not even attempted to memorize.

Upon registering, I had to argue once again that my scooter did in fact qualify as a full speed motorcycle since it's 80cc and it's a 1985 so the LSM (limited speed motorcycle) stickers didn't exist yet. Basically I'm exploiting a technicality as my old scoot barely crests 70KM/H (43 or 44 MPH).

In typical government fashion, they made the group of us wait about 15 minutes. The tester, I have some history with her. After failing my first driving test (the G1 exit road test), I retook it with her and passed. For my full G license, not only did I get her again, but passed...and in a standard transmission, having declined an offer to borrow an automatic transmission simply to challenge myself and put myself in a high pressure situation (I did my final road test 5 days before my license expired).

The first person did the cone weave. Thanks to CaptCrash's videos, I was not only prepared but very prepared. The first person to be tested wasn't prepared, despite protests that he had whizzed though it earlier that morning, he was looking everywhere but where he should have been, and was using his front brakes while leaned over, almost dropped his bike even. He gave up and returned to the start and the tester gave him a second chance. He almost made it back the second time, faltered near the end, stopped and literally gunned it over the last pair of cones. Tester failed him and told him to be on his way, then he proceeded to explain to us how he was "nervous and shaky". The funny part was that he had been bragging about how long he had been riding and how it was complete BS that he had to start his licensing again as his out-of province experience wasn't being credited.

Now, our cone run is very similar to how CaptCrash described the ALT MOST cone weave with the following differences. Instead of a single row of offset cones, there are two full rows, offset one meter (3.1 feet instead of two) and about 12 feet apart.

The next guy went and did alright on the cone weave, but the next test is to go straight through the two rows of cones at a walking pace, then do a U-turn, ride toward a line at speed and perform an emergency stop. He didn't seem to get the ride at speed thing and came at the line rather timidly (which I personally think is a sign that this guy will probably be pretty proactive at avoiding emergency stop situations). After two attempts, I though he was going to be failed, as she stopped him and called me up, but because she realized he had misunderstood the instructions she gave him another chance after the rest of us and he ended up joining us at the road test site after.

It was my turn now. After pulling up, showing my lights and everything in working order, and again discussing the semantics of why my scooter was not a limited speed motorcycle, our tester asked me if I was going to show the others how it was done, I gladly informed her that she was "damn right I will", we exchanged a smile and I dove right in.

This is where a few practice sessions and info from this site and CaptCrash's Roadwork videos really came in handy. In practice, I went from being a complete NOOB, to making a game out of the weave (I did find it great fun really) and had slowly gotten more and more aggressive, at times almost literally pulling my front tire off the ground as I turned my wheel from side to side and what felt like "slamming" my bike into each turn in the weave. I did that, with the mindset that I would hold back and be a bit more conservative in the actual test. It was ultimately rewarding. My eyes were always about a foot outside of the next cone I wanted to turn around and as soon as I was about four feet from my mark, I made sure that I had them on spot a foot outside my next weave. I was later told by one of the other guys being tested, whom I had randomly met in practice on that same site the week before, that I made him think of a bird weaving through the air. The best part about this, as mentioned in one of my above posts was that the weave was what I was most worried about and at this point, I just felt like I had it on lockdown and executed, though I maintain, due to the size of my bike, I still feel like I had a very unfair advantage.

When I did the slow control straight line, I wobbled a bit through the first cones as my transmission is a bit weird and doesn't always engage from a stop the way I think it will so I picked my feet up a bit earlier than I should have, but steadied it to the point where I thought I was going too fast...but as said often here, look forward, not down. Since she reminded me to come in fast for the emergency stop, I got to the end of the cones, started left and drew a large question mark shape to pick up speed and punched the throttle (remember...80cc scooter so really was less impressive than it sounded). I did come in pretty fast though and I drove at that line like it had wronged my little sister and I was gonna get it. It was funny cause she made a bit of a "eeeeeeeee" face as I was coming in and in what must have looked like a "handful of brakes" but was really a much practiced application of pressure and the knowledge that my front wheel will slide before I get pitched off, and with a very audible warning before it locks, I stopped, unfortunately before the line. I'm not sure if I just braked better than I had been in practice or if I misjudged my braking point and started to apply the levers too early.

She instructed me to drive a few blocks to the road test site.

After waiting for the other to join, as four out of five of us had passed, and much congratulatory celebrations, I started out on the road portion and got to be the first to go. Basically up a two lane (one in each direction) street seperated by boulevard, full stop sign, right turn onto a residential road, stop sign, right turn onto a two lane that becomes a single lane, right turn at traffic lights, lane change left, left turn across a main thoroughfare, left turn at a stop sign, left turn onto a one way street (same street as the traffic lights but it's one way up to that point and two way once you cross the main street), left turn at the traffic light. I almost messed this up as I forgot it was a one way street and was in the left lane at the red light with my left turn signal. A truck passed me on the right and at first, I was like "that son of a...." then realized I was in the wrong lane as I saw the tester run to the corner to watch my turn. I changed lanes after a mirror and shoulder check and made my turn from the proper lane, and caught a bit of a nod from the tester, thankfully. Left turn onto main thoroughfare, right lane change, right turn back to the starting point.

She told me I passed and to return to the DriveTest center to have the paperwork filed.

Now, I'm allowed to ride 24 hours a day and have a passenger. Assuming I'm on a bike that can make speed, I can also ride on the expressway and 400 series highways with a posted limit of 100KM/H (63MPH approx). As a restriction, I can't drink before I ride, but full license or not, that is a restriction I hold myself to and always will.

Sorry for being so longwinded, but I do fancy myself as a bit of a storyteller.

All told, information at this site, James' tips, CaptCrash's entire Youtube channel and the stories and threads posted here have been incredibly helpful. If anyone is looking to get their license in Ontario, I will gladly give a detailed account of the exam as well.

I also, as a side note, have applied for a line of credit from my bank to go toward the purchase of a 2014 Kawasaki Ninja 300 SE ABS. I've had several years of financial hardship and have spent the last couple trying to fix my credit, so I'm hoping I can reward myself a bit this coming may when I finally have my car paid off. Wish me luck :D

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rayg50
Male Moderator
2083 Posts
[Mentor]


NYC, NY
USA

Honda

Shadow Spirit 750DC

Posted - 09/27/2013 :  6:01 AM
Thank you for the very good first hand account.

quote:
I can't drink before I ride
Both you and rkfire mentioned this. My assumption is that any BAC greater than zero would result in a ticket or is there a greater penalty?

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AaronC
Male Standard Member
102 Posts


Windsor, Ontario
Canada

Honda

1984 Magna vf700c

Posted - 09/27/2013 :  10:58 AM
As per the drivetest.ca site:

What is the Novice Driver
Escalating Sanctions Program?
Each time you are convicted of any of
the 3 scenarios described above, the
sanction applied against your licence is
escalated as follows:
?
1st conviction or condition violation ?
30 day suspension.
?
2nd conviction or condition violation ?
90 day suspension.
?
3rd conviction or condition violation ?
your novice licence class will be
cancelled, any existing fees paid or
credit earned for driving experience will
be forfeited and you will need to
re-apply as a new driver.
These sanctions are designed to
provide a greater incentive to new
drivers to obey the conditions of GLS (Graduated Licensing System)
and the rules of the road
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