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 All Forums
 Motorcycle Safety
 Sharing of Lessons Learned
 Construction Zones
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CaptCrash
Male Advanced Member
744 Posts
[Mentor]


Nampa, ID
USA

Honda

Phantom
Peer Review: 1

Posted - 07/14/2015 :  4:59 PM                       Like
Hints and tips:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IGPWRl-soz8

TooManyHobbies
Junior Member
45 Posts


Patchogue, NY
USA

BMW

Posted - 07/16/2015 :  6:46 AM
Enjoyed it, thanks:-)
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gymnast
Moderator
4260 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, Idaho
USA

Harley-Davidson

Sportster Sport

Posted - 07/16/2015 :  8:52 AM
First rate video and information as per usual Crash!

The I-84 construction zones and traffic has been so bad this past year that I just stay off it. It is virtually impossible to maintain a space cushion, drivers constantly making erratic lane changes, and way too many people with their eyes on their phones instead of traffic. I just drive my truck to the Wednesday morning meetings of the Wheezers and Geezers MC at Eddies these days.
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greywolf
Male Moderator
1484 Posts
[Mentor]


Evanston, IL
USA

Suzuki

DL650AL2

Posted - 07/16/2015 :  9:03 AM
It would be nice if it were possible to enforce the speed limit and phone ban at construction sites without it causing a logjam, but magic would need to be real to do that.
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commonground
Male Standard Member
155 Posts


Windsor, PA
USA

Yamaha

V Star 1300

Posted - 07/16/2015 :  7:46 PM
Thanks Crash, another great video, more good info.
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1688 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Posted - 07/20/2015 :  11:51 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Just a nit to pick, but I generally try to stay off the seams in construction zones, where they shift the lanes over them. I find they sometimes turn into crevices that can become a wheel trap. Merging traffic may obscure the view.
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ColoRexer
Male Advanced Member
616 Posts
[Mentor]


Castle Rock, CO
USA

Kawasaki

ZX14

Posted - 07/24/2015 :  4:47 PM
Another threat in construction zones may be construction vehicles themselves. Near to my home there has been a long term bridge construction situation and I am seeing some really awful habits from the equipment operators. U-turns where you would never expect them, generally lax behavior that results from the operators working the same area for a long period of time, cutting corners, etc.

The immediate construction area is controlled with flaggers, but the outskirts of the area are where this is happening.

It isn't just about the road surfaces and confusing lane rerouting.
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Arnold
Male Standard Member
172 Posts


Santa Monica, CA
USA

Kawasaki

KZ1000

Posted - 07/27/2015 :  1:02 AM
There is already cameras in Los Angeles in satellites and unmarked planes. They can see the type of candy bar you are eating all the way from outer place.

In construction zones, many of the workers on state projects are not employed by Caltrans or Penn-Dot, or whatever state you live in. They are federal agents taking license plate scans. They are dressed undercover.

Finally, on the interstate there are a number of states (either Kansas or Nebraska I believe) where the cop cars have an xray machine so they can see what our are transporting.
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Horse
Senior Member
257 Posts


Newbury, Berkshire
United Kingdom

BMW

R850RT

Posted - 07/27/2015 :  4:08 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Arnold Finally, on the interstate there are a number of states (either Kansas or Nebraska I believe) where the cop cars have an xray machine so they can see what our are transporting.



And see your brain and read your thoughts, even through a tinfoil hat!
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Arnold
Male Standard Member
172 Posts


Santa Monica, CA
USA

Kawasaki

KZ1000

Posted - 07/27/2015 :  7:28 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Horse

quote:
Originally posted by Arnold Finally, on the interstate there are a number of states (either Kansas or Nebraska I believe) where the cop cars have an xray machine so they can see what our are transporting.



And see your brain and read your thoughts, even through a tinfoil hat!



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...1-800MP.html

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/po...gs-guns-car/

Any other smart remarks?
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Horse
Senior Member
257 Posts


Newbury, Berkshire
United Kingdom

BMW

R850RT

Posted - 07/28/2015 :  4:30 AM
Yes, read your own post.

There's a big difference between your "there are" and the article's "In the not so distant future" and "can only detect objects a few feet away".

Satellite quality? No arguments there - I deliberately didn't quote that text - but I'd be really surprised if they are used, ever, to target errant motorists.


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Horse
Senior Member
257 Posts


Newbury, Berkshire
United Kingdom

BMW

R850RT

Posted - 07/28/2015 :  4:41 AM


Not quite as you described.


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Arnold
Male Standard Member
172 Posts


Santa Monica, CA
USA

Kawasaki

KZ1000

Posted - 07/28/2015 :  12:05 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Horse

Yes, read your own post.

There's a big difference between your "there are" and the article's "In the not so distant future" and "can only detect objects a few feet away".

Satellite quality? No arguments there - I deliberately didn't quote that text - but I'd be really surprised if they are used, ever, to target errant motorists.




Wow. Do you ever get tired of being wrong? It must be exhausting. No wonder we kicked the hell out of you guys during the American Revolution. On top of that, your country was responsible for some of the worst engineering, food, and dental care known to man. Go drive a British-Leyland product from the 70's (that is if there are any left that haven't rusted away) and then you might realize why you are arguing from a position of weakness. The British aren't an authority on anything, with the possible exception of abject failure. Quite a legacy.

In the meantime, [lease see this article: http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsand...k-into-homes

From USA TODAY: "USA Today reports that 50 American law enforcement agencies have used the Range-R, a device that uses radio waves to detect if anybody is inside a house and where they are. The machine is so sensitive that it can sense human breathing from a distance of more than 50 feet (emphasis mine). The controversial form of detection is known as Doppler radar.

The technology is potentially in breach of the law. The US Supreme Court views these kinds of devices are illegal without a search warrant, although it's currently unclear whether their usage is a breach of the Fourth Amendment."

Exactly as I described. You're welcome.

Mods/James, there is NO disrespect intended by this thread. Merely having a little good natured humor with our friends across the pond.

P.S.

Why do the English drink warm beer?

....Lucas refrigerators!!

Edited by - Arnold on 07/29/2015 2:27 AM
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Horse
Senior Member
257 Posts


Newbury, Berkshire
United Kingdom

BMW

R850RT

Posted - 07/29/2015 :  5:34 AM
I'll let you get away with the 'humour' as the Lucas [AKA 'the Prince of Darkness] joke is actually quite good :)

However, your 'exactly' isn't the two State forces having systems in cars, as you claimed . . .


Back on topic, part of my day job is actually road worker safety. In fact, I was part of the team which made this possible:

http://www.rowsaf.org.uk/Newsletter...Issue%208%20[4].pdf [Read the 'Celebrating milestones' box]

That work was continued on to:
http://www.rowsaf.org.uk/Newsletter...Issue+11.pdf ['Eliminating carriageway crossings']

We actually have a very good record in the UK on road worker fatalities - most years zero or low single figures (but we're not complacent). It is, at least, one area where the US can (and does) learn and improve, such as the University of Kansas School of Engineering, which visited here a year or two back.

http://www.htma.info/industry-topic...-safety.html
Britain's roads are some of the busiest in the world. They are also some of the safest.

In today's traffic conditions, the live carriageway of any highway is a very dangerous place to work. An Oxford University study ranked it as the 16th most hazardous occupation in the UK. In 2005 HTMA reported 5 deaths and 12 major injuries - more than twice the number of fatalities of any of the previous five years. And all the fatalities were caused by workers being struck by oncoming vehicles.

Between 2003 and 2008, 11 road workers were killed and 104 were seriously injured on motorways and major routes in England


Bigger isn't always better.
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Horse
Senior Member
257 Posts


Newbury, Berkshire
United Kingdom

BMW

R850RT

Posted - 07/29/2015 :  5:40 AM
P.S. British inventions.


Reflecting telescope: Isaac Newton, 1668
Seed drill: Jethro Tull, 1701
Marine chronometer: John Harrison, 1761
Spinning frame: Richard Arkwright, 1768
Toothbrush: William Addis, c. 1770
Soda water: Joseph Priestley, 1772
Hydraulic press: Joseph Bramah, 1795
Steam engine: Richard Trevithick, 1801
Glider: George Cayley, 1804
Tension-spoked wheel: George Cayley, 1808
Tin can: Peter Durand, 1810
Modern fire extinguisher: George William Manby, 1818
Electric motor: Michael Faraday, 1821
Waterproof material: Charles Macintosh, 1823
Cement: Joseph Aspdin, 1824
Passenger railway: George Stephenson, 1825
Lawnmower: Edwin Beard Budding, 1827
Photography: William Henry Fox Talbot, 1835
Electric telegraph: Charles Wheatstone & William Cooke, 1837
Chocolate bar: JS Fry & Sons, 1847
Hypodermic syringe: Alexander Wood, 1853
Synthetic dye: William Perkin, 1856
Bessemer process: Henry Bessemer, 1856
Linoleum: Frederick Walton, 1860
Sewage system: Joseph Bazalgette, 1865
Modern Torpedo: Robert Whitehead, 1866
Telephone: Alexander Graham Bell, 1876
Light Bulb: Joseph Swan, 1880
Steam turbine: Charles Parsons, 1884
Safety bicycle: John Kemp Stanley, 1885
Pneumatic tyre: John Boyd Dunlop, 1887
Thermos flask: Sir James Dewar, 1892
Electric vacuum cleaner: Hubert Cecil Booth, 1901
Disc Brakes: Frederick William Lanchester, 1902
Stainless Steel: Harry Brearley, 1913
Military tank: Ernest Swinton, 1914
Television: John Logie Baird, 1925
Catseye (road stud): Percy Shaw, 1933
Jet Engine: Frank Whittle, 1937
Electronic programmable computer: Tommy Flowers, 1943
Hovercraft: Christopher Cockerell, 1953
Automatic kettle: Peter Hobbs, 1955
Float Glass: Alastair Pilkington, 1959
Hip Replacement: John Charnley, 1962
Carbon fibre: Royal Aircraft Establishment engineers, 1963
Collapsible baby buggy: Owen Maclaren, 1965
ATM: John Shepherd-Barron, 1967
World Wide Web: Tim Berners-Lee, 1989
Wind-up radio: Trevor Baylis, 1991
Steri-spray: Ian Helmore, c. 2008




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The Meromorph
Male Moderator
834 Posts
[Mentor]


White House, TN
USA

BMW

R1100RT

Peer Review: 1

Posted - 07/29/2015 :  6:11 AM
No harm, no foul...
Please stick to the topic...

[Edit: But it was close. The moderator 'saved' this from escalation. Thanks. JRD]
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Arnold
Male Standard Member
172 Posts


Santa Monica, CA
USA

Kawasaki

KZ1000

Posted - 07/29/2015 :  12:35 PM
Fair enough. And Horse, my thanks to you for making the roads safer (even if they are in the UK), your job is indeed an honorable one.

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