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 US motorcycle crash data 2017 (with updates through 2019)
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DataDan
Advanced Member
585 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 01/14/2019 :  11:31 AM                       Like
1/5/2021: New post with 2019 data released before year-end. Corrected 2018 post.

12/2/2019: New post with 2018 data released over the past month by NHTSA.

11/13/2019: Updated with data from final version of 2017 FARS database, released 10/30/2019. Total US deaths of 5229 remained below the previous high of 5337 in 2016. However, the revised total for California, 578, did surpass the state's previous high. I have also added a new post breaking down crashes by type.

4/17/2019: I've changed the thread title from "fatality data" to "crash data" because I'm adding a post on non-fatal crashes derived from NHTSA's Crash Report Sampling System, which I am now working with. CRSS (called GES, General Estimates System, from its 1988 inception through 2015), provides users with a weighted statistical sample of crashes, detailed data on (for 2017) 55,000 incidents representing a nationwide total of 6.5 million of all severities, non-injury to fatal. Among them are 3,000 motorcycle crash investigations representing a total of about 100,000.



As in previous years, I'm posting this short summary of the US fatal motorcycle crash data from NHTSA's FARS database. My 2016 post is here.


US Fatal Motorcycle Crashes 2013-2017

..............................|....2013|....2014|....2015|....2016|....2017
..............................|........|........|........|........|........
motorcycles in fatal crashes..|....4799|....4705|....5131|....5467|....5385
motorcyclists killed..........|....4692|....4594|....5029|....5337|....5229
other-vehicle occupants killed|......32|......26|......31|......46|......38
non-motorists killed..........|......39|......34|......40|......48|......40
..............................|........|........|........|........|........
median rider age..............|......42|......43|......42|......42|......41
..............................|........|........|........|........|........
rider drinking................|.....31%|.....31%|.....30%|.....27%|.....28%
..............................|........|........|........|........|........
rider BAC .01-.07.............|......8%|......9%|......9%|......8%|......9%
rider BAC .08-.14.............|.....11%|.....11%|.....11%|.....11%|.....11%
rider BAC .15+................|.....19%|.....20%|.....18%|.....18%|.....19%
..............................|........|........|........|........|........
speed related.................|.....36%|.....35%|.....35%|.....34%|.....34%
..............................|........|........|........|........|........
rider unlicensed..............|.....27%|.....30%|.....29%|.....28%|.....30%


Long-term trend

US motorcycle fatalities remain high. The 2016 total, revised from last year's post after a database update, is now greater than the previous high reported in 2008. This is due mainly to continued (though slow) growth of the sport. Motorcycle registrations were also at a high in 2016, and vehicle-miles traveled were near a high (2017 regs and VMT are not yet available).

Rider age and sex

Involvement of the Baby Boom generation (now age 53-71) in fatal motorcycle crashes continues to decline, down to 27% in 2017. Millennials (< 34) were a plurality at 36%, and riders under age 21 were < 6%.

Women were < 4% of fatal crash-involved riders, little changed over the past 10 years. If the Motorcycle Industry Council's latest estimate that women are now 20% of motorcycle owners is accurate, they seem to be taking the sport up very capably.

Drinking

The continued decrease of drinking riders in the fatality data is good news. (The "rider drinking" row in the table above reports riders who either had a BAC more than 0 or were judged to have been drinking by the crash investigator.) Note that of those with reported BAC, half were in the highest group, .15+.

Motorcycles involved

Cruisers were the motorcycle style in the greatest percentage of fatal crashes again in 2017, at 40%, sportbikes slightly less at 36%, and touring bikes at 17%. Increasingly popular adventure bikes (hard to isolate because they are usually classified as "enduro" by NHTSA) were no more than 2%.

Trikes, which climbed sharply in fatal crash involvement for a few years, were unchanged in 2017. A majority of riders in these crashes are age 60+, and 20% were women.


Have a question about a factor I haven't mentioned, or about your state? Post it up and I'll dig up the answer if I can.


Edited by - DataDan on 01/05/2021 1:48 PM

scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6943 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 01/14/2019 :  4:39 PM
Thanks for posting this information.

Out of curiosity, do you know why it takes a whole year for this information to become available?
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DataDan
Advanced Member
585 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 01/15/2019 :  10:09 AM
Well, I procrastinated for 3 months after downloading the database. So there's that.

The crash investigation itself takes a while for a fatality. The California crash database published by CHP has both the crash date and the date processed into the database. For fatalities it takes an average of 5 months to be entered, for minor injury crashes 1.5 months.

After the investigation is complete and the report written, it goes to NHTSA (part of US DOT) to be transformed into FARS database format. Some of that process is automated, of course. Date, time, location, etc. are just moved from one place to another. Coded items are easy, too: "M" for male in the CHP database becomes "1" in FARS.

Then comes the hard part: translating the investigating officer's words and pictures into the system's numeric codes.

Edited by - DataDan on 12/02/2019 10:32 AM
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DataDan
Advanced Member
585 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 04/17/2019 :  12:28 PM
Crashes by motorcycle type and rider age

Which bikes crash most, cruisers or sportbikes? That provocative question has been a hot topic of discussion since before the internet. I'm afraid I can't answer it because there is no data available on exposure--annual miles ridden by motorcycle type. Counts can be compared--more of these crash than those--but likelihood of a crash can't be compared without additional information.

Nevertheless, I offer this for your consideration:

Crash Involvement by Motorcycle Style and Rider Age, 2013-2017

STYLE................%CRASHES.....%FATALS....CRASH AGE...FATAL AGE
------------------------------------------------------------------
cruiser.................41%.........40%..........44..........48
sport...................29%.........36%..........30..........31
touring.................16%.........15%..........50..........54
scooter..................5%..........2%..........42..........50
traditional..............4%..........3%..........37..........40
enduro...................2%..........2%..........38..........46
dirt.....................2%..........2%..........25..........29

combined...............100%........100%..........40..........43

Percentages are fraction of all police-reported motorcycle crashes by bike type. This breakdown is possible because "style" is now a published datum in the NHTSA databases, via auto industry marketing information company R.L. Polk. We probably wouldn't agree with all the classifications, but they seem to reflect a good understanding of the market.

Cruisers are mostly Harleys, 67%, but some Harleys are touring. Sportbikes are the Gixxers you expect, but also my FJR. Traditionals are standards, including most older bikes. Dirt bikes are mostly street legal but also include motorcrossers. Enduros comprise the full range of adventure bikes, from 250s up to BMW R1200GS.

A few observations: For all classes except sportbikes, fatal crash involvement is lower than all crash involvement. IOW, sportbike crashes tend to be deadlier. OTOH, scooter crashes are much less likely to be fatal. Ages are pretty much what you'd expect from knowing who usually rides what. One exception is scooters; crash age is older than I would have expected. Note that for all groups, fatality age is higher than crash age. This supports my claim that crash lethality increases with age, discussed in the thread Vulnerability of older riders in motorcycle crashes.


Data from NHTSA's Crash Report Sampling System (2016-2017), General Estimates System, Fatality Analysis Reporting System.

Edited by - DataDan on 04/17/2019 12:49 PM
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Eagle Six
Junior Member
32 Posts


Snowflake, Arizona
USA

Kawasaki

ZX14R

Posted - 11/13/2019 :  2:23 PM
Hi Dan, first Thank You for all the information you provide and the time you spend to publish this data.

I do have a question about the chart below. 1st, if your FJR is included in the 'sportbike' class, then I would assume my Ninja ZX14r is also in that class, especially considering my style of riding (which is more liter bike than sport touring) and appropriate for me.

Is my assumption correct that the number listed under 'CRASH AGE' the average age of all riders involved in the crash percentage? And, that the number listed under 'FATAL AGE' is the average age of all riders involved in the crash totals for that class that died?

Thank You and Best Regards......George


quote:
Originally posted by DataDan

Crashes by motorcycle type and rider age

Crash Involvement by Motorcycle Style and Rider Age, 2013-2017

STYLE................%CRASHES.....%FATALS....CRASH AGE...FATAL AGE
------------------------------------------------------------------
cruiser.................41%.........40%..........44..........48
sport...................29%.........36%..........30..........31
touring.................16%.........15%..........50..........54
scooter..................5%..........2%..........42..........50
traditional..............4%..........3%..........37..........40
enduro...................2%..........2%..........38..........46
dirt.....................2%..........2%..........25..........29

combined...............100%........100%..........40..........43


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DataDan
Advanced Member
585 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 11/13/2019 :  3:54 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Eagle Six

I do have a question about the chart below. 1st, if your FJR is included in the 'sportbike' class, then I would assume my Ninja ZX14r is also in that class, especially considering my style of riding (which is more liter bike than sport touring) and appropriate for me.

Is my assumption correct that the number listed under 'CRASH AGE' the average age of all riders involved in the crash percentage? And, that the number listed under 'FATAL AGE' is the average age of all riders involved in the crash totals for that class that died?

Yes, yes, and yes.

The ZX14R and the Concours 14 are both categorized as sportbikes.

CRASH AGE is the average age of all riders in crashes on those bikes. FATAL AGE is the average age of riders killed on those bikes.
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Eagle Six
Junior Member
32 Posts


Snowflake, Arizona
USA

Kawasaki

ZX14R

Posted - 11/13/2019 :  4:05 PM
quote:
Originally posted by DataDan

quote:
Originally posted by Eagle Six

I do have a question about the chart below. 1st, if your FJR is included in the 'sportbike' class, then I would assume my Ninja ZX14r is also in that class, especially considering my style of riding (which is more liter bike than sport touring) and appropriate for me.

Is my assumption correct that the number listed under 'CRASH AGE' the average age of all riders involved in the crash percentage? And, that the number listed under 'FATAL AGE' is the average age of all riders involved in the crash totals for that class that died?

Yes, yes, and yes.

The ZX14R and the Concours 14 are both categorized as sportbikes.

CRASH AGE is the average age of all riders in crashes on those bikes. FATAL AGE is the average age of riders killed on those bikes.



Thank You Dan for the clarifications. At 73 1/2 I'm beating the odds, and will do my best to keep it that way!
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DataDan
Advanced Member
585 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 11/13/2019 :  4:25 PM
From 2013 to 2017, NHTSA estimates that around 560,000 motorcycle crashes of all severities--from non-injury to fatal--were reported to police in the US. How did they occur? The Crash Report Sampling System includes variables that describe them in considerable detail. In the table below I list the top 10 crash types by percentage of all crashes, accounting for 84% of the total.


US Motorcycle Crashes by Type, 2013-2017

.......................................single/.........
.......................................multiple........
....type of crash......................vehicle.........
-------------------------------------------------------
.1..overturn...........................single.....17.1%
.2..departed roadway...................single.....15.6%
.3..oncoming left-turner...............multiple....8.2%
.4..rear-end, motorcycle striking......multiple....8.2%
.5..sideswipe same direction...........multiple....7.2%
.6..struck obstacle....................single......7.0%
.7..rear-end, motorcycle struck........multiple....6.1%
.8..overturn...........................multiple....6.0%
.9..intersecting straight paths........multiple....4.3%
10..left-turner crossing from right....multiple....4.2%
.......................................................
....all................................single.....42.9%
....all................................multiple...57.1%


As would be expected, left-turners account for the largest percentage of multiple-vehicle crashes, 12.4% including both oncoming and crossing from the right. Overturns are mostly crashes under braking, and multiple-vehicle overturns were likely due to the motorcyclist braking in response to a threat. I didn't dig any further to find out what factors contributed, but from another analysis I estimate that braking and overturning in response to a left-turn threat would add another percentage point to the 12.4% left turn proportion.
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DataDan
Advanced Member
585 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 12/02/2019 :  10:30 AM
2018 Crash Data Update

Over the past month, NHTSA has released the initial versions of both the 2018 FARS database (Fatality Analysis Reporting System, a complete account of fatal US motor vehicle crashes) and the 2018 CRSS database (Crash Report Sampling System, a weighted sample of all US motor vehicle crashes). Rather than start a new thread, I am adding summaries of the 2018 data as a new post here.

US MOTORCYCLE CRASHES 2014-2018

....................................2014......2015......2016......2017......2018.....total
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
motorcycles in all crashes.......110,486...102,346...134,290...116,305...109,010...572,437
median rider age all crashes..........38........38........38........38........38........38
rider drinking all crashes..........5.9%......4.6%......6.3%......5.5%......5.9%......5.7%
speed related all crashes..........15.1%.....13.5%.....11.0%.....12.9%.....13.0%.....13.0%

motorcycle VMT (millions).........19,970....19,606....20,445....20,149....20,076...100,246
crashes per million VMT..............5.5.......5.2.......6.6.......5.8.......5.4.......5.7


FATAL US MOTORCYCLE CRASHES 2014-2018

....................................2014......2015......2016......2017......2018.....total
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
motorcycles in fatal crashes.......4,705.....5,131.....5,467.....5,385.....5,115....25,803
motorcyclists killed...............4,594.....5,029.....5,337.....5,229.....4,985....25,174
median rider age fatal crashes........43........42........42........41........42........42
rider drinking fatal crashes.......30.8%.....29.9%.....27.0%.....28.4%.....26.8%.....28.5%
speed related fatal crashes........34.7%.....34.5%.....34.5%.....34.0%.....32.7%.....34.1%

other-vehicle occupants killed........26........31........46........38........40.......181
non-motorists killed..................34........40........48........40........46.......208

deaths per hundred million VMT......23.0......25.7......26.1......26.0......24.8......25.1

crash lethality.....................4.6%......3.7%......4.3%......4.3%......4.3%......4.2%


Trends

Total crashes and motorcycle vehicle-miles traveled are estimates made from small samples, so year-to-year differences should be taken with a grain of salt. I try to use multiple-year moving averages to support conclusions. Fatalities from the FARS database, OTOH, are an actual count

The moving average of estimated total crashes was approximately unchanged in 2018. Crash rate (per million vehicle-miles traveled) averaged over 5 years (2014-2018) has been roughly flat in the post-recession period. Drinking and speeding did not change significantly in 2018. As discussed in the thread The Remarkable Decline in Motorcycle Crash Rate, US motorcycling is, arguably, as safe as it has ever been, at least in terms of crash rate.

Fatalities were down in the first 2018 FARS release compared to the final 2017 release, and I do not expect much of an increase in the 2018 final release (this time next year). The moving average of crash lethality--motorcyclist deaths as a percentage of motorcycles in crashes--was roughly unchanged in the short term as well. However, over a longer period--since 1990--lethality has increased, driven by two factors: the vulnerability of older crash-involved riders, and the increasing involvement of more deadly vehicles (SUVs, pickups, vans).

The age effect is discussed in the thread Vulnerability of older riders in motorcycle crashes. There I reported lethality for the 65+ age group as 5.6%, averaged over years 2012-2016. For 2014-2018 that increased to 5.8%.

The light truck effect is discussed in Fatal Design Revisited. At the time I posted that thread, I estimated that for the most recent year, 251 motorcyclist lives would have been saved if the light truck proportion of multiple-vehicle motorcycle crashes had been 20%, as it was in 1990. Now, with the 2018 data, light truck proportion has increased to 40% and the estimate of additional deaths has increased to 285.



US MOTORCYCLE CRASH TYPES 2014-2018

..................................single/...........
..................................multiple..........
type of crash.....................vehicle...........
----------------------------------------------------
overturn..........................single.......16.2%
departed roadway..................single.......15.6%
vs. left-turner...................multiple.....13.0%
cutoff............................multiple.....10.5%
crossing vehicle .................multiple......9.6%
rearend, motorcycle striking......multiple......8.5%
hit obstacle......................single........7.3%
rearend, motorcycle struck........multiple......5.9%
other/unknown.....................single........3.1%
other/unknown.....................multiple.....10.2%

all...............................single.......42.2%
all...............................multiple.....57.8%


FATAL US MOTORCYCLE CRASH TYPES 2014-2018

..................................single/...........
..................................multiple..........
type of crash.....................vehicle...........
----------------------------------------------------
departed roadway..................single.......27.3%
vs. left-turner...................multiple.....20.6%
crossing vehicle..................multiple......8.9%
head on...........................multiple......6.7%
rearend, motorcycle striking......multiple......5.5%
overturn..........................single........5.4%
cutoff............................multiple......4.8%
hit obstacle......................single........3.9%
rearend, motorcycle struck........multiple......3.5%
other/unknown.....................single........2.3%
other/unknown.....................multiple.....11.2%

all...............................single.......38.8%
all...............................multiple.....61.2%


The crash type tables above are similar to the previous post covering 2013-2017, but categories are slightly different, and along with the table showing all crashes, I added a second with fatal crashes only. Categories are based on the CRSS and FARS variable ACC_TYPE, which breaks down crashes into 95 different types (see Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) Analytical User's Manual, 1975-2018, page 210). For the purpose of this post, crash types are broadened into the more general categories seen above. For example, 10 different ACC_TYPE variations of roadway departure are combined.


Crash Type discussion

Overturn. Includes mostly crashes under braking. Multiple-vehicle overturns likely due to the motorcyclist braking in response to a threat. Originally coded as ACC_TYPE other (along with many other others) I identified these through other variables. These are less likely than average to be fatal: They comprise 16% of all crashes but only 5% of fatalities.

Roadway departure. Ran off the roadway then hit a guardrail, tree or post, or overturned. High lethality--i.e., more likely than average to be fatal.

Vs. left turner. Oncoming or crossing from right. High lethality.

Cutoff. Includes all manner of collisions where vehicles traveling in the same direction try to occupy the same space at the same time. Lane change, right turn from right, left turn from left, merging or entering traffic, sideswipe. Low lethality.

Crossing vehicle. Intersecting straight paths, turn across path (except the two kinds of left turns). Average lethality.

Rearend. Motorcycle either striking or struck. Both low lethality.

Hit obstacle. Parked vehicle, debris, animal, pedestrian. Low lethality.

Head on. Includes both direct head-on crashes and opposite-direction sideswipes. High lethality.


As always, if you have a question about the data presented here, or about something I haven't covered, post it up. I'll answer it if I can.


1/5/2021: I have corrected the fatal crash rider drinking % and speed-related %, which were wrong. I have also updated the crash lethality % from all motorcycle occupant deaths to rider deaths only, which I believe is a more accurate representation of lethality.

Edited by - DataDan on 01/05/2021 1:49 PM
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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6943 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 12/03/2019 :  8:20 PM
Thanks for you informative posts.

quote:
Originally posted by DataDan

The light truck effect is discussed in Fatal Design Revisited. At the time I posted that thread, I estimated that for the most recent year, 251 motorcyclist lives would have been saved if the light truck proportion of multiple-vehicle motorcycle crashes had been 20%, as it was in 1990. Now, with the 2018 data, light truck proportion has increased to 40% and the estimate of additional deaths has increased to 285.
I'm curious if there is any measurement of states with a higher percentage of trucks, like Texas or Idaho, compared to those with fewer trucks, like California.
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DataDan
Advanced Member
585 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 12/04/2019 :  9:50 AM
quote:
Originally posted by scottrnelson

I'm curious if there is any measurement of states with a higher percentage of trucks, like Texas or Idaho, compared to those with fewer trucks, like California.


An ideal measure to compare exposure of motorcyclists to cars and light trucks would be vehicle-miles traveled by vehicle type and state. However, while vehicle type distribution is available for the US, I haven't found it by state. Without that, it could be helpful to compare crash involvement by vehicle type--which would assume that vehicles are involved in crashes in roughly the same proportion as their presence in the population. But again, an estimate is available for the US but not by state. What is available is fatal crash involvement by vehicle type and state. Fatalities, of course, are only a small percentage of total crashes, so it's something of a leap to use vehicle type representation in fatal crashes as a surrogate for distribution in the population. With that weaselly disclaimer...

This table shows involvement of light trucks (pickups, SUVs, vans, minivans, crossovers) in all fatal crashes and in fatal crashes vs. motorcycles:

Light Trucks in Fatal US Vehicle Crashes 2014-2018

......................vehicles...............light
......................in fatal.....light....trucks
.......................crashes....trucks....vs. mc
--------------------------------------------------
Alaska.....................505.....53.3%.....62.5%
Montana..................1,151.....52.0%.....65.6%
Wyoming....................815.....48.3%.....57.9%
North Dakota...............778.....46.1%.....44.4%
South Dakota...............797.....45.8%.....48.9%
Nebraska.................1,615.....45.1%.....48.6%
Arkansas.................3,664.....45.0%.....58.3%
Idaho....................1,484.....43.5%.....52.2%
Oklahoma.................4,652.....43.4%.....46.6%
West Virginia............1,873.....43.3%.....59.8%
Louisiana................5,210.....43.2%.....49.2%
Mississippi..............4,383.....42.7%.....51.1%
Colorado.................4,202.....42.6%.....51.9%
Maine......................998.....42.5%.....53.3%
New Mexico...............2,427.....42.4%.....42.6%
Texas...................25,716.....42.3%.....48.4%
Alabama..................6,250.....42.0%.....52.7%
Hawaii.....................708.....41.7%.....53.8%
Oregon...................3,008.....41.0%.....51.6%
Kansas...................2,738.....40.9%.....47.9%
Utah.....................1,959.....40.3%.....51.1%
Kentucky.................5,278.....40.2%.....47.8%
Iowa.....................2,319.....40.2%.....43.6%
Michigan.................7,244.....40.1%.....45.0%
Georgia.................10,309.....39.7%.....46.6%
Missouri.................6,251.....39.5%.....46.7%
Minnesota................2,765.....38.9%.....42.8%
South Carolina...........6,751.....38.8%.....50.1%
Washington...............3,739.....38.8%.....48.8%
Tennessee................7,142.....38.6%.....51.3%
Indiana..................6,032.....37.9%.....48.9%
North Carolina...........9,812.....37.7%.....48.2%
Wisconsin................3,931.....37.7%.....41.9%
Arizona..................6,403.....37.7%.....49.1%
Virginia.................5,340.....37.6%.....48.4%
Nevada...................2,241.....35.9%.....40.4%
Illinois.................7,257.....35.5%.....43.5%
New Hampshire..............778.....35.0%.....41.7%
Ohio.....................7,965.....34.5%.....43.4%
Delaware...................876.....34.5%.....37.3%
New York.................6,994.....34.2%.....44.9%
Florida.................21,499.....33.9%.....42.0%
Massachusetts............2,382.....33.9%.....39.3%
Pennsylvania.............8,439.....33.9%.....47.3%
New Jersey...............4,029.....33.3%.....40.7%
California..............24,847.....32.8%.....40.7%
Maryland.................3,676.....32.3%.....41.5%
Vermont....................388.....31.2%.....50.0%
Rhode Island...............377.....30.5%.....46.2%
Connecticut..............1,969.....28.7%.....37.3%
District of Columbia.......176.....26.7%.....31.3%

US.....................252,142.....38.1%.....45.8%

Light truck crash involvement covers a wide range--higher in more rural states. As would be expected, involvement is greater in fatal motorcycle crashes than in fatal crashes in general, due to greater lethality of light trucks compared to cars in motorcycle collisions.

Though I have calculated motorcycle crash lethality (fatalities as a percentage of all crashes) by state for only a few states, the variation in light truck exposure (along with helmet laws) could help explain some of the differences I've noticed.
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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6943 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 12/04/2019 :  5:10 PM
Thanks.
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DataDan
Advanced Member
585 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 01/05/2021 :  1:46 PM
2019 Crash Data Update

Just before year-end, NHTSA released the initial version of the 2019 FARS database (Fatality Analysis Reporting System, a complete account of fatal US motor vehicle crashes), the final version of 2018 FARS, and the initial (and probably only) version of the 2019 CRSS database (Crash Report Sampling System, a weighted sample of all US motor vehicle crashes). I am adding to this thread summaries of the 2019 motorcycle data from those sources.

Trends I've commented on before in this thread are basically unchanged: Motorcycling popularity in terms of registrations and vehicle-miles traveled is down ever so slightly. Crash and fatality rates are unchanged within the accuracy of estimates. Average age of crash-involved riders is unchanged. However, going only by my daily reading of motorcycle-related news in the general media, I expect that we will see big changes for 2020 when I post my next update a year from now.


US MOTORCYCLE CRASHES 2015-2019

....................................2015......2016......2017......2018......2019.....total
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
motorcycles in all crashes.......102,346...134,290...116,305...109,067...110,531...572,539
median rider age all crashes..........38........38........38........38........38........38
rider drinking all crashes..........5.8%......6.6%......5.6%......6.3%......6.6%......6.2%
speed related all crashes..........13.7%.....11.5%.....13.1%.....12.9%.....12.1%.....12.6%

motorcycle VMT (millions).........19,606....20,445....20,149....20,076....19,688....99,964
crashes per million VMT..............5.2.......6.6.......5.8.......5.4.......5.6.......5.7



FATAL US MOTORCYCLE CRASHES 2015-2019

....................................2015......2016......2017......2018......2019.....total
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
motorcycles in fatal crashes.......5,131.....5,467.....5,385.....5,172.....5,114....26,269
motorcyclists killed...............5,029.....5,337.....5,229.....5,038.....5,014....25,647
median rider age fatal crashes........42........42........41........42........41........42
rider drinking fatal crashes.......29.9%.....27.0%.....28.5%.....26.9%.....28.4%.....28.1%
speed related fatal crashes........34.5%.....34.5%.....34.0%.....32.7%.....34.5%.....34.0%
other-vehicle occupants killed........31........46........38........40........42.......197
non-motorists killed..................40........48........40........47........45.......220

deaths per hundred million VMT......25.7......26.1......26.0......25.1......25.5......25.7

rider crash lethality...............4.6%......3.7%......4.3%......4.3%......4.3%......4.2%
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Eagle Six
Junior Member
32 Posts


Snowflake, Arizona
USA

Kawasaki

ZX14R

Posted - 01/05/2021 :  2:17 PM
Thank You Dan, as always Good Stuff
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