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 Scraping Floorboards During Turns
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5150
New Member
10 Posts


Corvallis, Oregon
USA

Honda

VTX 1300S

Posted - 10/01/2005 :  12:19 AM                       Like
I've been noticing that I can't seem to keep up with my riding buddies through curves. Whenever I try to keep up by increasing my speed I end up scraping my floorboards therefore I end up slowing down in order to negotiate the turn. At first I thought it was because my bike was lower to the ground (I have a Honda 2005 VTX1300S), but one of my friends has a Harley Softail and he seems to have no problem going faster through the turns. Am I doing something wrong if I'm scraping the floorboards? Is it a matter of technique that I will be able to improve?

scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6950 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 10/01/2005 :  5:46 AM
I've never had a problem with scraping floorboards (or any other parts) on any of my bikes in turns.

The only time that has happened is when I've ridden Harleys (3 times).

Could you learn to "hang off" of the bike to keep it more upright? That is, move your weight over to the inside of the turn.

You can also take a bit wider line through a turn so that you don't have to lean quite so much. Maybe slow down a bit more right before entering the turn then accelerate once you've got it turned. If you take a late apex and always enter turns at the outside edge of the road you'll have a larger radius in your turn, requiring less lean angle.

Can the bike be raised at all to increase clearance? I raised the rear of my ST2 a full inch to improve handling, for example, by adjusting the shock absorber linkage. Can you give the bike more spring preload to raise it?

Maybe you need to reconsider which is more important, the low rider look or cornering clearance.
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Gs82Seca650
Male Advanced Member
1990 Posts
[Mentor]


Southern, PA
USA

Yamaha

1982 XJ 650 R Seca

Posted - 10/01/2005 :  6:50 AM
Hello 5150,

Very nice bike!

Scott gave you some excellent advice and I agree with what he posted.
I can only add that if you are pushing yourself that hard to keep up with your friends, maybe you might consider not riding with them or at least talking to them about it. Perhaps you already have. I would slow down and ride at your own pace. I have never drug a peg or floorboard on anything I have ridden. Generally, I do not attempt to take turns at speeds anywhere near where I would drag a peg or floorboard. If your dragging floorboards, your near the point of washing out the bike.

I could be totally wrong with this, but I believe if you go to the "stickeys" at the top of the general discussion board, you will find one where James R. has posted a few video clips of his presentations. I remeber him saying something to the effects that raising your bike WILL NOT help prevent dragging pegs. Again, I have not watched the clip for a few days now and I could be incorrect on that, but I would reccomend that you watch those clips, they are excellent. I am on dial-up at home and I cannot open multiple windows or I would go get you the link.

Take care and be safe.
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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17379 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 10/01/2005 :  6:55 AM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Well, raising the bike's frame will allow you to lean farther but that puts you very close to a wash-out situation as your tires must be in excellent condition to maintian traction.

Your pegs or floorboards drag as a warning that you are close to the traction limits of your tires. Testing that limit is a racer's paradise and a prudent man's nightmare.
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5150
New Member
10 Posts


Corvallis, Oregon
USA

Honda

VTX 1300S

Posted - 10/01/2005 :  8:15 AM
quote:
Originally posted by scottrnelson

I've never had a problem with scraping floorboards (or any other parts) on any of my bikes in turns.

The only time that has happened is when I've ridden Harleys (3 times).

Could you learn to "hang off" of the bike to keep it more upright? That is, move your weight over to the inside of the turn.

You can also take a bit wider line through a turn so that you don't have to lean quite so much. Maybe slow down a bit more right before entering the turn then accelerate once you've got it turned. If you take a late apex and always enter turns at the outside edge of the road you'll have a larger radius in your turn, requiring less lean angle.

Can the bike be raised at all to increase clearance? I raised the rear of my ST2 a full inch to improve handling, for example, by adjusting the shock absorber linkage. Can you give the bike more spring preload to raise it?

Maybe you need to reconsider which is more important, the low rider look or cornering clearance.



Thanks for the advice. I do have a question regarding "Hanging off" of the bike. I'm assuming you mean shifting your weight to the right if you are making a right turn?
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don_hud
Advanced Member
1077 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, Texas
USA

Yamaha

1997 Virago XV1100

Posted - 10/01/2005 :  10:18 AM
Riding in groups has it advantages and dis-advantages. One of the dangers that you have to be careful of when riding with others is trying to push yourself beyond your skill level trying to keep up. It often results in an accident. Don't let the peer pressure of trying to keep up, cause you to do something you are not prepared for. Cornering is a skill that takes practice and the right technique. Probably the most important thing to learn about cornering is to get the bike slowed down to a safe speed before you enter the turn.

Learn and practice safe cornering and don't let other push you to a level that you are not comfortable with.
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subvetSSN606
Senior Member
418 Posts
[Mentor]


Ellettsville, IN
USA

Suzuki

800 Intruder

Posted - 10/01/2005 :  5:53 PM
Hard to tell just from the description...
But is it possible you're "fighting" the lean? That is could you unconciously be keeping your body vertical instead of leaning with the bike? If so, that would force you to lean the bike more in a turn at a given speed.

If you're not sure, I'd suggest having one of your fellow riders follow you and look for whether you are leaning with the bike or not.

Tom

Edited by - subvetSSN606 on 10/01/2005 5:55 PM
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fish4walleye
New Member
11 Posts


Central, NY
USA

Yamaha

Maxim750 "82"

Posted - 10/02/2005 :  7:05 AM
Talk about a coincidence,just yesterday I test drive that very same bike,had the same problem,tried everything and could not make turns at a reasonable speed without scraping,also seemed that the reach to the handlebars was a little long but no problem with my size,but then my knees seemed up a bit high,,one sweet ride but the short seat and the scraping kind of turned me off to it(the knees up so high affected the back with-in 20 mi.),I mentioned the scraping to the dealer and his reply was( that's why the running boards are on pivot and swing up" but i don't like the sound and think a little additional engineering is needed, did a short ride on a shadow spirit(1100) and will be returning for a more involved test as that seemed to fit the needs of my wife and I better,but like I said will need another more in-depth look into before purchasing,and possibly an optional seat,etc.,,,Ride Safe,Mark

Edited by - fish4walleye on 10/02/2005 7:12 AM
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subvetSSN606
Senior Member
418 Posts
[Mentor]


Ellettsville, IN
USA

Suzuki

800 Intruder

Posted - 10/02/2005 :  8:08 AM
Well, if it is a characteristic of the bike (I don't know), then it is a characteristic of the bike. As a rider we have to know both our own limitations and the limitations of the bike we are on, and ride accordingly. To do anything less is irresponsible.

There are things that can be done to improve the bike, there are things that can be done to improve the rider, but at all points in the process as Clint Eastwood said... "A man's got to know his limitations."

Tom
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Mikey
Male Senior Member
287 Posts


Benton, Kentucky
USA

Harley-Davidson

FLHTCI/XL/FXDL

Posted - 10/02/2005 :  8:48 AM
Sounds like an inherant characteristic to the 1300 vtx. One of the riders where I work has an older model, 1800 vtx. It doesn't look that low in the parking lot - I'll ask him next week if it is board-dragger.
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Russ
Starting Member
4 Posts


Phoenix, AZ
USA

Yamaha

Road Star

Posted - 10/02/2005 :  11:41 AM
I have a Road Star. Many modern cruisers are specifically designed to drag floorboards well before any traction limit can come into play. The low cruiser look provides less clearance, so we don't ride cruisers to their performance limit. Since we cruiser riders don't ride them "hard," they build them with less clearance, so we don't ride them as hard. hehehe

Here's a link to a pic of a cruiser dragging through a turn. It looks to me like he's leaning about 45 degrees, and the sparks are flyin'. It certainly started to scrape a few degrees sooner.http://www.roadstarmagazine.com/mod...icle&sid=268

Sorry guys. On this style of bike some of the previous comments ("close to a wash-out") are not as accurate as with other bikes. Other motorcycles, designed to a saner standard, are not meant to touch anything to the ground except the tires. If something hard ever does touch pavement, it means you are exceeding design limits. Many low cruisers (certainly the Road Star) are designed to scrape something movable to try to straddle the "low to the ground" and "can turn tighter than an 18-wheeler" needs.

So, 5150, the answer is, "You're not necessarily doing something wrong when your floorboards scrape. See the 'fighting' the lean post, and look at your entry/exit speeds as suggested, but your bike may just like to make sparks. Let it ;-)"

Be safe, be prudent, know your limits. But also know some low cruisers' limits are less than their tires' and/or riders'.
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don_hud
Advanced Member
1077 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, Texas
USA

Yamaha

1997 Virago XV1100

Posted - 10/02/2005 :  10:44 PM
Here is a link to a thread about a rider that was riding in a group ride and not sure if he was going too fast to try to keep up with the group or not, but went into a turn too fast and crossed over the line. Don't push it, it isn't worth it, you don't get a second chance to make up for some mistakes. This just happened on 09/30/05.

http://www.pashnitforum.com/forum/s...page=1&pp=15
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4432bravo
Male Junior Member
31 Posts


Spring, Texas
USA

Honda

GL1100A

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  9:13 AM
I have been watching and studing the use of floorboards for a few weeks now in anticipation that I would install them on my GL1100A. The first thing I noticed was that newer bikes have the floor boards mounted above the foot pegs and some are mounted forward and above the foot pegs like highway pegs on my GL1100A. The next thing I did was to look at bikes, friends and others, that had floor boards mounted where the foot pegs were. They all had some scratches on the bottom edges. Next, I started talking to the owners of these machines. You can imagine the range of responses, so I tried to distill the information about how the floor boards affected the riders driving habits. ALL of them told me that they had to adjust for the floor boards reducing the amount of lean they could execute in a turn.

Given, this is not a scientific study, just my way of getting a sample of experience from owners of floor boards on their motorcycles.

Conclusion. I decided not to install floor boards.

Jerry Seay
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jollyroger
Advanced Member
2157 Posts
[Mentor]


St. Charles, MO
USA

Harley-Davidson

Springer Classic

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  11:45 AM
Well someone correct me if I'm being erroneous or out of touch with reality, but weren't (aren't) floorboards designed to enhance the touring riders' comfort on extended trips?
I'm pretty sure they're not intended for use on canyon carvers or for folks who want to use their touring bikes as such.
Can it be done? Sure, as the earlier posted Deal's Gap (tail of the dragon) videos showed, but if you had the audio on, our cameraman was rubbing the boards at nearly every curve.


But then again, I could be wrong...
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Mikey
Male Senior Member
287 Posts


Benton, Kentucky
USA

Harley-Davidson

FLHTCI/XL/FXDL

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  12:35 PM
quote:
Originally posted by jollyroger

Well someone correct me if I'm being erroneous or out of touch with reality, but weren't (aren't) floorboards designed to enhance the touring riders' comfort on extended trips?
I'm pretty sure they're not intended for use on canyon carvers or for folks who want to use their touring bikes as such.
Can it be done? Sure, as the earlier posted Deal's Gap (tail of the dragon) videos showed, but if you had the audio on, our cameraman was rubbing the boards at nearly every curve.


But then again, I could be wrong...


I have scraped boards or whatever on the electraglide only a couple of times and those were when I went in a little hot into some country road dogleg curves. I had as much scraping on the touring mufflers as I did on the boards. THe cruisers and tourers are low to the ground and their lean angles are not as great as sport bikes. The only exception I see to that is the Honda Goldwing and they have footpegs standard with optional boards (am I right on that??) and the mufflers & exhaust pipes are upswept a little. I couldn't compare on the BMW's or the Ducati's as there few in my immediate area.
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amhopf
Male Standard Member
216 Posts


Littleton, Colorado
USA

Honda

02 VFR800 ABS

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  4:28 PM
I have this problem all the time since lowering my bike and putting on floorboards. What I found was that if my board scraped on a corner and I leaned to the inside, the board would clear the road. Now I just anticipate this and lean in on all sharp curves and I have reduced my dragging dramatically. I may look silly on my cruiser leaning so far in to curves, I feel like a racer, but you get comfortable with it, it’s really no big deal. One thing you have to watch is when leaning, don’t lean over the line into the oncoming traffic! It’s easy to do. I do almost all of my riding on twisty canyon roads, and I keep up with my sport bike friends…enough.
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Mydlyfkryzis
Senior Member
274 Posts
[Mentor]


West Milford, NJ
USA

Honda

1991 Nighthawk 750

Peer Review: 1

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  5:59 PM
Here's a Harley Scraping the boards and losing it. Good thing his gear will protect him







I don't believe this rider reads this forum...
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scottrnelson
Advanced Member
6950 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, ID
USA

Honda

XR650L, 790 Adv R

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  6:08 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Mydlyfkryzis

I don't believe this rider reads this forum...


Notice how he's leaning to the inside of the turn in that last photo.
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OB
Male Advanced Member
529 Posts


Houston, TX
USA

Buell

1125CR and others

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  6:10 PM
Well, you have a crusier. Want more ground clearance? Buy just about any other type of bike! Your friends will not be able to keep up with you then.

// OB
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Indiana Randy
Moderator
2118 Posts
[Mentor]


Fort Wayne, Indiana
USA

Honda

2000 Magna V4 750

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  6:17 PM
All bikes are designed with a certain type of riding experience in mind. Touring bikes and cruisers are no more designed to eat up twisties like a sport bike than they are to be in the dirt hill climbing.

I can't endorse leaning into the corner 'like a racer' to help correct a scraping/dragging problem.

The solution is to remount the floorboards higher OR slow down.
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kiddal
Male Advanced Member
1561 Posts
[Mentor]


SE, Indiana
USA

Kawasaki

KLR650

Posted - 10/03/2005 :  7:49 PM
If you notice the front wheel is not rotating (or rotating much slower than the rear) in picture number 2. He must have grabbed a bunch of front brake.

Also notice how the bike is doing much better after the bothersome rider has been ejected. It is actually more upright in picture #3!

Edited by - kiddal on 10/03/2005 7:52 PM
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