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 All Forums
 Motorcycle Safety
 Technical/Maintenance
 Fix-a-Flat for motorcycles
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jeffgn
Male Starting Member
9 Posts


landers, ca
USA

Kawasaki

vn800

Posted - 02/17/2007 :  4:51 PM                       Like
It has come to my attention (after two flats and hours of waiting) that having a way to fix a flat tire (my are tube type) on the side of the road would be a lot better then calling for help every time I run over a thumbtack. I was wondering if it is safe to use fix-a-flat on motorcycle tires? They have motorcycle specific fix-a-flat but it cost (at the dealer I go too) 10 dollars a can. Even then it says not to ride over 35 mph if you use it. So my question is, is there a real difference between the normal cheaper fix-a-flat you use on a car compared to the motorcycle specific fix-a-flat that cost 5 times as much for a smaller can? Or is it just another product that’s had its price increased by slapping the word motorcycle on the can. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

WarHawk
Male Advanced Member
1796 Posts


Baytown, Texas
USA

Yamaha

'07 V-Star Custom

Posted - 02/18/2007 :  1:52 PM
http://www.ride-on.com/prod_mot.asp

This might help..and if it keeps you from being stuck w/o causing any safety issues such as tire wobble or out of balance I am sure its worth it

Some people/dealers dont like messing with tires that have been done this way

This stuff isn't fix a flat, its "prevent a flat"

These guys unlike other tire sealers, have a full line of researched products, going from bike tires to industrial strenght construction machines

http://www.ride-on.com/test_motorcycle.asp
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Gs82Seca650
Male Advanced Member
1990 Posts
[Mentor]


Southern, PA
USA

Yamaha

1982 XJ 650 R Seca

Posted - 02/19/2007 :  6:25 AM
In a pinch, I don't see any issues with using regular car fix-a-flat, but let me preface that by saying I am NOT a tire expert. If you chose to go that route, I would only use enough to properly inflate the tire and I would ABSOLUTELY ride at a reduced speed (IE 35 MPH). Also, when you get somewhere to have the tire replaced MAKE SURE you tell the technician that you put that stuff in the tire BEFORE he dis-mounts the tire. (Safety reasons)

When I had my front tire replaced, the shop did not have a spin balencer (small shop, but a great guy). He put some sort of product in that supposedly will seal any future leaks and also balences the tire as well.

After about 3K miles, it is working great with no balence issues.

Good luck.
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OB
Male Advanced Member
529 Posts


Houston, TX
USA

Buell

1125CR and others

Posted - 02/19/2007 :  8:04 AM
I personally don't use fix-a-flat. If I don't have one, I will buy a plug kit from the local stop n' go (or whatever) and plug the tire. All my motorcycles now have tubeless tires so it is an easy job.

For the safety minded, plug at your own risk. There is a chance that it will let loose at higher speeds and if you try to plug a cut, it will not work well. I personally have ridden many miles on a plugged tire without concern since I was the one plugging it and knew what the hole was like.

They do have carbon dioxide tire fillers that are small enough to carry around. I have even seen these being sold at Wal-Mart now. Getting the flat tire to a actual air pump works much better if you are going to plug the tire.


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Victory
Advanced Member
633 Posts
[Mentor]


Pawcatuck, CT
USA

Victory

10th Anny Vision

Posted - 02/19/2007 :  1:22 PM
"Works in Tubes and Tubeless Tires

Ride-On TPS will eliminate 85-95% of your flats in tubeless tires from objects up to 1/4" (1/8” for tube tires) that penetrate the contact area of your tire. Ride-On’s efficiency in tube tires is reduced to 55-65% since puncturing objects often tear the tube. It is impossible for a tire sealant to seal a tear. It is vital to remove the puncturing object immediately from a tire containing a tube to prevent further damage that can result in tearing the tube.

A quote from their site. Now I have fixed a boat load of tires in my day. None of them M/C tires. A tube is a pain. Many of the flats with tubes I patched had pieces inside the tire that could cause more damage if not removed. If you have to remove the piece you might as well install a new tube. One of the big problems I noticed with tube tires that most people missed was the boot. Many times the boot was old and dry and it caused more flats than the other objects in my repairs. Everytime a tube tire went flat on my personal vehicles I would install new boots also. (the boot is the piece of rubber that goes between the tube and the rim. some may know it by another name)
How many times the only way I found the object was running my hand on the inside of the tire. You couldn't see anything on the tread side but the end of a screw or nail was just sticking through the inside enough to puncture the tube. (learn to wear cottn gloves when doing this, hint, hint, the object snags the cotton as easy as it cuts your skin)
Another thing I would check are the spokes if you have them. There might be one sticking through the boot under pressure causing your flats.

I have patched a lot of tires. I patched them on the vehicles back when they told you not to. The first time I couldn't get the wheel off cause some "mechanic" had the wrong rims on the car and forced them on using the lug nuts. Today they tell you to plug on the vehicle and then drive the vehicle cause the heat from the tire makes the adhesive setup better.

The only thing I own now that has a tube tire is my wheelbarrow and I have to blow that up every couple of weeks.

Hope this helps.
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Niebor
Ex-Member

Posted - 02/19/2007 :  8:32 PM
re: "Hope this helps."

LOL, Not at all! In addition to my motorcycle, four bicycles, and a snowblower with tubes. I use Slime in the "problem" bicycles.

This product appears to have merit for motorcycle application. I'm interested enough to listen to more opinions, short of being ready to run out and buy the product.

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WarHawk
Male Advanced Member
1796 Posts


Baytown, Texas
USA

Yamaha

'07 V-Star Custom

Posted - 02/19/2007 :  9:27 PM
I ordered 2 8oz bottle (kits) + shipping for $40

We shall see how it does, especially since I have tubed tires
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gtscpe
Standard Member
110 Posts


san diego, ca
USA

Honda

'06 Goldwing

Posted - 02/21/2007 :  8:14 AM
Coincidently, I was on a group ride last Saturday, and at lunch one of the bikes had a flat back tire. We were out in the "country", but found a couple of cans of the fix-a-flat at the general store. Used one can, and then topped off the air. 70 miles back into town, no problems. It sold me on the product.
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bkikkert
Male Advanced Member
847 Posts
[Mentor]


Cornwall, Ontario
Canada

Harley-Davidson

Ultra Classic '08

Posted - 02/21/2007 :  5:48 PM
This is the first time I have heard of these products being used for tires with tubes. I think I might investigate further. Fixing the tire is one thing but what about the air? Are there any 12 volt air compressors that don't take up half a saddle bag's worth of space?
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Baggsy
Male Advanced Member
728 Posts
[Mentor]


Ottawa, Ontario
Canada

Suzuki

09 Wee

Posted - 02/21/2007 :  9:15 PM
It's about $40+ US to ship it way up here.

I'd like to get some since my tire size is becoming less common, and I'd like them to last.

I guess I'll have to see if a group wants to mass order.
Or wait for Walmart to stock it, which may take a while since it's not made in China. Costco uses it in their fleet maybe they'd consider stocking it too.


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Niebor
Ex-Member

Posted - 02/22/2007 :  9:46 AM
Here is a procedure to make a "mini" air compressor from one of the small auto units. Pretty much what I carry around:

http://www.bluepoof.com/motorcycles..._compressor/
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bkikkert
Male Advanced Member
847 Posts
[Mentor]


Cornwall, Ontario
Canada

Harley-Davidson

Ultra Classic '08

Posted - 02/22/2007 :  6:10 PM
Thanks Niebor....that looks like a great idea..
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WarHawk
Male Advanced Member
1796 Posts


Baytown, Texas
USA

Yamaha

'07 V-Star Custom

Posted - 03/07/2007 :  1:22 PM
Juat a followup guys

Got my Ride-On kits in the mail approx 7 business days after order

Put the exact required amount in my tires (5oz front, 8oz rear)

Took the bike out and rode approx 10 miles, went very slow in the neighborhood for a bit to allow it to coat the inside instead of lumping up in the bottom and creating vibrations

Once the tires were warm it really does what it says, almost ALL tire vibration is gone, the bike "feels" more stable, and I have noticed that the tires dont need filling as much (even though I check it regularly I dont have to add as much air as often)

I will say this if you get the sqeeze bottles, cut the tips right up against the 1st ring, otherwise the hole is too small and makes it a pain to squeeze the "gel" into the tire, go slow, measure often (I put my finger over the hole and slung the "gel" down against the nozzle to get a good reading on how much I was putting in

I have innertube tires so it says only 50-65% cause punctures usually rip the tube...you guys with tubeless radials it says 80-90% I think

So far it does what it says, reduces vibration (balances tires), eliminates the tiny, invisible porosity leaks that cause tires to deflate over time

So far cant say the $40 was a waste, we shall see if I get a flat or not

Apparently if I would have gotten the MOTOKIT I would have gotten 3 bottles for the price of 2!

http://www.ride-onshop.com/Products...rcycles.html
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domluke
Male New Member
14 Posts


Brooklyn, NY
USA

Suzuki

GZ250

Posted - 03/14/2007 :  10:16 AM
It seems like an exact amount of Ride-On sealant has to be put in the tire. If using it to only balance (no flat), what do you do if you later get a flat? Can you add more? If not, you’ll still need some help to get off the side of the rode.
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WarHawk
Male Advanced Member
1796 Posts


Baytown, Texas
USA

Yamaha

'07 V-Star Custom

Posted - 03/14/2007 :  1:05 PM
quote:
Originally posted by domluke

It seems like an exact amount of Ride-On sealant has to be put in the tire. If using it to only balance (no flat), what do you do if you later get a flat? Can you add more? If not, you’ll still need some help to get off the side of the rode.



Well the common concensus here reports that once you get a puncture its time to replace the tire..the Ride-on will just keep you from getting stranded in the middle of nowhere, once you destroy the integrity of the tire (by running over a nail/screw/whatever) patching it only stops the air from coming out, you only have 2 tires to ride on and risking that tire having a catastrophic failure because you didnt replace it after you patched it isnt something I am willing to risk

I have inner tubes..so if I get a puncture and the tube doesnt rip (thus only like 50-60% effective with tubed tires) I will then be taking it in to have the dealership replace the tube..then I will have to refill with the required amount of Ride-on
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