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 'Good advice'? - Cash's skydive adventure
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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17333 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 11/30/2018 :  3:22 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend                        Like
Some of you may remember that my riding partner, Cash, when she began riding her own bike, experienced fear when riding over very high bridges.

Always wanting to be helpful, I made a suggestion to her and called it good advice: "Just close your eyes!"

Yep, she was the rider, not a co-rider, at the time. Yep, she ignored my advice. (Thankfully)

So, tomorrow morning on her 70th birthday, Cash is getting on a very, very high bridge and jumping off it. Well, it isn't a bridge, it's an airplane. She's decided to take up skydiving!!!

Our administrator here, Vladimir, is an experienced skydiver and has convinced her that the practice is safer than riding motorcycles. He's probably right.

My advice to her: "Just close your eyes!"

Wish her well.

onthebeach
Male Standard Member
117 Posts


Arch Cape, Oregon
USA

BMW

R 1200 RT

Posted - 11/30/2018 :  3:58 PM
My hat (helmet?) is off to someone with a fear of heights making a jump. I am guessing this will be a tandem jump so some freefall time to enjoy the view from above.

My first jump was static line so I had to climb out on my own. As soon as the door opened and I heard the sound and felt the wind my brain told me this was nuts and I should stay in the plane. But due to the repetitive training on the ground I followed commands and got out on the strut and let go when instructed. I have 100 jumps and enjoyed it. But a lot of standing around time compared to time in the air.

Follow up with a post to let us know how Cash enjoyed the jump.
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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17333 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 11/30/2018 :  4:16 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Yes. it's a tandem jump. I hear it's from 13,000 feet.

I'll let you know and will give her your support.
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DataDan
Advanced Member
569 Posts
[Mentor]


Central Coast, CA
USA

Yamaha

FJR1300

Posted - 11/30/2018 :  8:16 PM
Good luck, Cash. You'll never get me to jump out of one of those things. And I'm still weeks away from 70.
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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17333 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 12/01/2018 :  12:30 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Yesterday it was low cloud cover, today it was high winds.

Cash's jump is rescheduled for this coming Friday.
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Eagle Six
New Member
11 Posts


Snowflake, Arizona
USA

Kawasaki

ZX14R

Posted - 12/01/2018 :  2:39 PM
My first freefall jump was in a stripped out (to save weight) civilian Cessna 172, and I couldn't hardly wait to get out of that rattle trap, and I'm also a pilot with thousands of hours in little Cessna's and other fixed wings!

It's worth waiting for a good day, clear skies and low winds, especially for her first jump. Good Luck Cash and have an enjoyable flight.

I'll bet you a dozen donuts, when your feet are on the ground, and as soon as you unhook from the instructor, you will be ready to go again!!

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Alan_Hepburn
Male Standard Member
198 Posts


San Jose, Ca
USA

Honda

1994 GL1500SE

Posted - 12/01/2018 :  5:45 PM
I've got somewhere around 25 static line jumps, and I got paid to do them! Of course we carried a ton of stuff with us, and there were a lot of us in the air at the same time! Now I'm content to let others pay to do it - the Army doesn't want me any more...
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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17333 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 12/08/2018 :  7:51 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Friday was heavy rains - another delay.

It seems that the soonest Cash will be able to 'jump into the wind' will be early January.

I think part of the excitement is one delay after another.
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Vlad
Male Administrator
8 Posts


Rijeka, PG
Croatia

Honda

CBX 500XA

Posted - 12/10/2018 :  6:19 AM
I also remember long waits for my first jump, the weather, than the plane maintenance, then weather again, plus usually it is doable only on weekends. I had at least 3-4 months of wait :)
While waiting for it to happen you do it many times in your head,
so when it gets to happen you are kind of experienced with less stress as you already done it :)
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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17333 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 01/05/2019 :  2:42 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Yesterday the winds were too high again, but today it was perfect. Cash did her skydive this morning!

No matter how I tried to unnerve the girl, she toughed it out. Before she went up I asked her if she thought it was a more apt description to talk about the result of a failed chute opening in terms of pancakes or jello. She merely sneered.

Here she is preparing for the jump with her tandem jumper:


This is the first time I could see her canopy in the sky:


(In the original you can see a rainbow to the left of her.)

A little closer to the ground:


Approaching the beach where she landed:


Here she did a 180-degree turn on approach:


Finally, she VERY GENTLY lands (on her butt) :


You probably think she had been on the ground for some time when that picture was taken. Not at all. It was no more than FIVE SECONDS after they landed. The guy leaning toward the landers was apparently the 'target' - he was there, I think, in order to help prevent anybody doing a face-plant when they touched down. Both Cash's and her partner's legs were held horizontal when they landed - INTENTIONALLY on their butts.

She can't wait to do it again!!!
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Eagle Six
New Member
11 Posts


Snowflake, Arizona
USA

Kawasaki

ZX14R

Posted - 01/05/2019 :  3:43 PM
Congratulations Cash, great job and landing on your butt when tandem is just as good as your feet.

Of hundreds of skydivers first time, I have only heard one tell me once was enough, all the rest were raring to do it again!
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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17333 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 01/05/2019 :  9:06 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
It was so bright today that I could not see any detail on my cell phone screen. Nevertheless, I took twenty-four pictures and only these six were any good. One of the 'bad' ones included my finger over the lens. Sue me.

She jumped from 14,000 feet.

I swear she was under parachute control for fifteen minutes but she insists that it was much shorter. I think she's right because her tandem partner, just before they took off, said he'd see me in thirty minutes on the ground, "or in twenty-five if the chute doesn't open."
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Cash Anthony
Female Administrator
1469 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, Texas
USA

Honda

Magna 750

Posted - 01/05/2019 :  11:29 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
These guys were the best! The company is called Skydive Galveston, and in every way, I felt my instructor, Simon Walton, was professional and caring. As I told him after we were down, he'd made me feel safe the whole way through.

His qualifications were also sterling. An Aussie, he said he'd been a naval parachutist and diver (similar to our navy SEALS, I think). Not only did he go step by step through explaining what he was doing to get me outfitted and ready for the jump, I also watched how carefully he checked the parachutes again just before we went up. And he strapped a life vest on me first, in case we landed in the drink. He also handed me a little white circle of candy wrapped in cellophane as we took off -- a Life Saver, in case I felt I needed one.

I never really felt scared, which surprised me. I was a little surprised when, just after we exited the plane, we did a flip so as to end up on our stomachs. I'm still not sure what direction we went to do that, but he'd warned me that it would happen.

Simon gave excellent instructions on the ground and assured me he'd remind me about them twice more, once in the plane and again as we were descending. He also said that, in the event I not only forgot everything he'd told me to do but somehow screwed it all up after he reminded me, he would still manage to get us both down safely. "It might be a bit more of a challenge," he said, "but I can handle it." (I didn't forget -- I wasn't sure how well I executed his instructions, but I definitely tried to.) He also managed to get video and still shots before and during the jump.

Besides feeling safe with a tandem jump, it was also fun when he let me "drive" the parachute so we could turn and see the ground from different angles.

The pilot said he'd heard a lot of people say the best part was the ascent in the plane, when they were able to look around. That wasn't true for me, because it was a gorgeous day and we could see more than 50 miles up and down the coast, and inland all the way to downtown Houston.

I have to say, I was shocked to see the video -- which no one else will see, for sure. I didn't realize how much one's skin would be flapping around when going that fast during free fall, nor how much mine would be plastered against the bones in my face. Many of the still photos, however, were excellent shots. I'll send them to Jim tomorrow -- had to hurry off to an event tonight.

It will amuse Jim to hear that, just as I felt ten feet tall when I got my motorcycle endorsement on my driver's license, I also found myself thinking about the several thousand people in the audience with me tonight -- and wondering how many had jumped out of a perfectly operational plane and called it fun.

We jumped at about 14,000 feet, according to the office manager. And yes, I would do it again in a heartbeat. But if I never get to do that, I'll always be glad I went up and then came down neither a pancake nor Jello this one time.
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Eagle Six
New Member
11 Posts


Snowflake, Arizona
USA

Kawasaki

ZX14R

Posted - 01/06/2019 :  10:44 AM
Excellent jump report Cash, Thank You for posting. Not too short, not too long. It shows your passion, excitement and joy of the free fall and canopy decent. You also express inspiration for others who are interested in skydiving and remembrance for those few who have done it.

For me it's similar to riding, it never gets old, but I got comfortable and look forward to each jump whether free fall or static. And it proves adrenaline junkies never get old......well I'll reserve that 'old' statement for myself!

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James R. Davis
Male Administrator
17333 Posts
[Mentor]


Houston, TX
USA

Honda

GoldWing 1500

Posted - 01/07/2019 :  7:21 PM Follow poster on Twitter  Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
Here are a few more pictures of the skydive. They were taken by Cash's tandem partner.

This one shows the moment they exited the airplane:


Here they are in freefall (Cash is NOT Screaming - she was 'clearing her ears' ):


This was when the chute opened and the tandem partner was inspecting it:


Notice that the tandem partner had his arms extended - meaning that Cash was 'driving/controlling' the chute:


And this is the certificate she earned: (Please note the name of the company and their URL as we STRONGLY recommend them.)


This was a professional operation from start to finish. Enormous effort was made by them to explain everything (multiple times) and ensure that all aspects of the effort were competently inspected/assembled/utilized.

They took one or two people up on each flight, each with a seasoned/qualified tandem partner, and I think they made at least four trips a day (depending on the weather, of course).

That person who I described as the 'target' above was also a tandem partner. He got to the landing site about fifteen minutes before the plane flew over it, stuck a wind flag near where they were going to land, used a radio and communicated with the plane about the conditions of the site ("four-knot winds from South/Southeast, no obstructions."), then went out to where he thought they should land and waited for them.

They were not just accommodating, they were genuinely friendly. And two of them were motorcyclists!
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