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 Motorcycle Safety
 Rider Training Courses
 Army to Accept Track Day Training To Fullfill Advanced Training Requirement
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gymnast
Moderator
4260 Posts
[Mentor]


Meridian, Idaho
USA

Harley-Davidson

Sportster Sport

Posted - 12/02/2011 :  9:26 AM                       Like
Via Road Racing World,
"The Team Pro-Motion Advanced Rider Training (ART) School has received official recognition and approval from the US ARMY COMBAT SAFETY CENTER.

Soldiers can now choose the Team Pro-Motion ART program as one of five certified and approved schools throughout the country which provide the skills to enhance safety and rider control.

Team Pro-Motion for the past 15 years has provided motorcycle riders safety training in an environment conducive to learning without the obstacles that street riding presents. Team Pro-Motion conducts all its schools at select road racing tracks located on the east coast of the U.S. Team Pro-Motion also provides riders with access to over 80 days at various tracks for open sessions under supervision for safe and enjoyable riding with coaching and instruction available.

?For many years our team has trained with riders who seek more from themselves and their machines. This recognition is confirmation that our program is able to instill the confidence and knowledge necessary for advancement and safety for today's riders?, said Glen Goldman, President of Team Pro-Motion.

Team Pro-Motion's ART curricula "meet the sustainment training required in AR 385-10, The Army Safety Program, paragraph 11-17(6) Rapid ActionRevision, dated 4 October, 2011. A Soldier can meet sustainment training requirement, at no expense to the government, by taking an Army-approved, advanced level Motorcycle course." https://safety.army.mil/povmotorcyc...Default.aspx

For more information concerning Team Pro-Motion riding schools, open track opportunities and special military programs please visit teampromotion.com

http://www.teampromotion.com/MTD-page.php


http://www.roadracingworld.com/news...rticle=46782

rkfire
Advanced Member
1713 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 12/02/2011 :  12:02 PM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
I don't know. Good luck to them.

One thing on their site strikes me as odd, "You will learn how to: Utilize your body mass for accurate turning".

Sounds like body steering to me.
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kilodelta
Male Junior Member
54 Posts


Stafford, VA
USA

Suzuki

SFV-650

Posted - 12/02/2011 :  1:27 PM
I read over the description of the newly approved course for the Army's motorcycle saftey sustainment training requirement. I just don't see how learning how "ART-Level I students will learn all the basic skills necessary to get on the track in the safest, most fun way possible" tranlates well to meet the Army requirement. On the road, not the track is probably the Army's key problem with motorcycle accidents... I think that the Army would be better served to just have the basic traffic and motorcycle saftey content rehashed for sustainment purposes...
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TonicBIA
Male Senior Member
382 Posts


Arlington, Va
USA

Triumph

Sprint ST

Posted - 12/05/2011 :  6:20 AM
quote:
Originally posted by rkfire

One thing on their site strikes me as odd, "You will learn how to: Utilize your body mass for accurate turning".

Sounds like body steering to me.



TPM's curriculum only believes in countersteering. However, they have a similar approach to many advanced schools in making sure the body is in line with the bike, or biased towards the turn to take the greatest use of available cornering clearance and traction. Many riders lean out of the turn, especially the sharp ones, and aren't even aware of it.
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TonicBIA
Male Senior Member
382 Posts


Arlington, Va
USA

Triumph

Sprint ST

Posted - 12/05/2011 :  6:22 AM
quote:
Originally posted by kilodelta

I just don't see how learning how "ART-Level I students will learn all the basic skills necessary to get on the track in the safest, most fun way possible" tranlates well to meet the Army requirement.



That's an interesting argument that's taken place in other services as well. While the track works to refine particular skills such as cornering, braking and turn theory to a higher level than street oriented courses, it does it from a performance mindset. All those skills are directly attributable to street riding, but will the soldier be able to make that transition?
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rkfire
Advanced Member
1713 Posts


Stratford, CT
USA

Suzuki

Bandit

Peer Review: Blocked

Posted - 12/05/2011 :  9:35 AM   Join poster on Facebook as Friend  
quote:
Originally posted by TonicBIA

quote:
Originally posted by rkfire

One thing on their site strikes me as odd, "You will learn how to: Utilize your body mass for accurate turning".

Sounds like body steering to me.



TPM's curriculum only believes in countersteering. However, they have a similar approach to many advanced schools in making sure the body is in line with the bike, or biased towards the turn to take the greatest use of available cornering clearance and traction. Many riders lean out of the turn, especially the sharp ones, and aren't even aware of it.



Ok. To me, it was odd to use the word "accurate" in the description.
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TonicBIA
Male Senior Member
382 Posts


Arlington, Va
USA

Triumph

Sprint ST

Posted - 12/05/2011 :  10:30 AM
Understood. You have to place yourself in a performance environment where dragging a hard part may preclude the system gaining the lean required to navigate the turn. There are some tricky spots on Summit Point's Shenandoah track that you either do with good body posture, or significantly less speed.
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